A330 LINE PILOT CQT SIMULATOR COMMENTS


URGENT: PLEASE SEND  CQ SIM INTEL ASAP!

 I really need your input on the SPOTS, LOFT, and non-normal events that occurred during your ride so I can construct a new matrix of the scenario events and triggers. Please send me a summary of your experiences in the simulator to:
busdriver@hky.com

This page is a summary of the comments forwarded to me by the line pilots after completing their CQ training event. The material presented is in it's raw form as submitted to me for your review. As the program progresses and changes are implemented, it is vital I receive feedback to update the SPOT and LOFT scenarios.

If you encounter any differences or additions as related to your sim experience, just jot them down in an Email and send it my way: busdriver@hky.com
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Known CQ Scenario Triggers

To be determined from YOUR feedback ...

 
  LINE PILOT FEEDBACK

This is where your comments will be posted ...

 
January 19, 2018

Just completed my first A330 R9 training; I was paired with another FO on HIS first A330 R9! Sounds like a recipe for pain, but actually it was a good experience overall. Neither of us had flown an actual trip for over two months before this, but it all comes back pretty quick, and with our combined 18 months of experience and 5 actual A330 landings between us, we set out to make an impression on our sim instructors.

Bottom Line-if you know your triggers and flows, memory items, and know the non-normal methodology, you will do fine. All the instructors we had were true gentlemen, and all had the big picture and want you to succeed. Also, it is a ‘come as you are’ three days, as you probably won’t have enough time between days for any significant study time (if you are a ‘just in time assembly’ guy that preps for the next day on the night before, recommend you do all that prep prior to entering the three day chute, or you will just be tired). Finally, go SLOOOWWW in the sim, as things tend not to explode or develop that quickly on an Airbus; and, if you push the wrong button, it sometimes takes much longer to un-push it than to just count another potato prior to pushing it.

Preparation. I started about a month out getting materials ready for the sim, but didn’t actually dive in until about two weeks out, and that seemed to be enough advance prep. From AApilots.com, I downloaded and printed out the CQ Training Guide (aapilots.com\Training & Quals\Training Home\Recurrent & Requalification Training\A330\A330 Continuing Qual Training Guide); this is a good all-inclusive guide and I mention it because at least one pilot in our group did not know it even existed. You will also need this guide uploaded to your iPad because it has the paperwork for your RLE (that being said, our check airman gave us a paper copy to use in the sim). I also take the SPOT Summary page (aka script) into the sim with me w/memory joggers; it helps you know what is coming next, and no sim instructor has ever said anything to me about it. Also, from aapilots.com under Training Materials, download the RTS Briefing slideshow, R9 Briefing slideshow, A330 Takeoff and Landing Briefing slideshow (included because it has some good slides on doing stuff like V1 cuts), and use the A330 Videos-New link to view/download the four videos for A330 confirmed items, Non-normal methodology, Airbus multiple ECAM, and A330 Evacuation checklist. From the airbusdriver.net site I printed out the CQT scenario comments, flows guide, simulator callouts and briefing guides. Lastly, I have the memory of a goldfish, so I keep a stack of index cards nearby and make a flash card for anything that doesn’t seem to be sticking in my brain (also have them for all the memory items).

Day one-Academics. Day starts at 1:15pm and goes to 7:15pm. They flipped things on the schedule this time, and we did FMB first. I won’t bore you with all the details, but it is densely packed training. You cover the proper use of flightdeck O2, massive slideshow on how to properly do an INFO-ITEM, good graduate-level tips on using Jeppeson Pro, how and when to use the AA Trip Kit, etc. This block is followed by the Human Factors class-probably the easiest block to stay awake in. There are three-plus hours of systems academics on: Windshear, Non-normal methodology, EGPWS, APU, Engines, Fire Protection, Fuel system. Some of it translated into helping in the sims, as you will do windshear and non-normals there (and you’ll know a lot about the APU but in the RLE it is MEL’ed so you won’t even have it!). As always, you do emergency equipment and the doors (we did ours in the middle of systems to break up the monotony). Only one pilot has to do the door in recurrent.

Day Two-Security Training. Your sim time determines when you will do security training. We had a D session, so we did it prior to our sim brief. It centers around threat levels, punching ‘Bob’ (only one guy does it and we had an FFDO who volunteered), and use of the tuff cuffs (no one has to actually use them in recurrent).
RTS. The RTS sim is flown exclusively out of Zurich (LSZH); it is identical for R9 & R18, and the SPOT guide is pages 10-11 in the CQ Training guide (it just says R18 on it, but it’s the same thing for R9). Overall comment is that the whole sim is ‘train to standards’ so in the unlikely event you screw something up, you’ll just do it again. We had a great sim instructor who had a truly big picture and wanted us to do good. Zurich has a boatload of restrictions and procedures that will boggle your mind, but don’t get wrapped around the axle about ANY of them: the primary reason you do the sim from Zurich is that it is in mountainous terrain and has our one and only A330 EO SID there that is pre-built into the FMS.
SPOT 1- We started at the end of RWY 16; did the DEGES 2R RNAV departure (kind of hides under DEGES 1D & 2R RNAV plate 10-3B). No problems for awhile and a chance to warm up. Going thru about 15K got a failure of both main fuel pumps for the no 1 engine (FUEL Left pump 1 LO PR, FUEL Left pump 2 LO PR-NOTE: they are both in the same collector tank); during the ECAM and doing the follow up items, you will be driven to page 101 ETOPS (you end up on page 103) and it will tell you “If multiple pumps in same tank fail: do NOT enter ETOPS). It was a little non-standard, but we were briefed that the CAPT assigns the PF duties to himself, and the FO would run the ECAM. While all this is going on, Zurich switches to the VOR Rwy 34 Approach, and you divert back to Zurich. We also got issued holding instructions off KLO (I think it was NW of KLO on the 320 radial) so we got to run that drill (did a couple of turns while we got ready for approach). When you set up for this approach, include the GIPOL approach via; this is kind of a sim thing, and it gives you the ZH725 fix (this is the fix where you start your sharp turn inbound on the approach at 7K). Once the approach was in the FMS, we were given direct ZH725. This is an energy management exercise, and the sooner you slow and get down to altitude the mo bettah (recommend you strive for 7K and 210 KIAS by ZH725). You will be cleared for the approach prior to this point, so should have approach armed already at ZH725. That being said, the next alt is 6K and it may not go down even though you have the brick, so be ready to open descent to 6K (descent seemed to work fine after that, and the descent to 6K worked one out of two times shooting the approach). Configuring early is your friend. Also, the MDA is at 1024’ AFE, so that is a little non-standard (it comes while the PF is calling ‘stable’ at 1000’). Also, you come in on a 330 degree course; you are 10 degrees off from rwy 34, and 10 degrees off from rwy 32, so make sure you pick the correct runway! Finally, there is a displaced threshold for rwy 34, so use the PAPIs for your glidepath guidance (it is fairly well defined, even in sim 1).
SPOT 2. Reset in the air for the ILS to Rwy 16 CAT II Approach and Go around. No tricks here; during the brief, use the new terminology for a soft go around (“In case of a go around, I will use soft GA thrust, however TOGA is available if required”). Soft go around is the new normal, and we got ours at ENUSO, the FAF. If you haven’t looked at this yet, go look at the callouts (OM Pt. 1 pg 359 2g.3 Go-Around Actions and Callouts). The new callouts don’t have the rhythm of the old ones, so you may want to chair fly it once.
SPOT 3. Alt law maneuvering-did this at 15 K; instructor turns off two ADRs (if you get to do it, use the Pbs not the wafer switches!) to put you in alternate law (FO switches EFIS to 1). No automation, so just hand-flying some turns. Next we practiced nose high/low upset recoveries (one FO does his from the left seat). Instructor uses the opposite stick from the PF to put you in a nose high attitude (‘one peak is worth a thousand crosschecks’ is applicable during the setup); with nose high, pitch is king, so solve your pitch problem first, then use up to 60 degrees of bank to slice the nose down if required. Ease the power in as nec., as additional power will cause the nose to pitch up. On the nose low, solve your roll problem first (roll wings level in the shortest direction); bring your speed into the crosscheck and adjust power/SBs as nec. We zoomed up to 35K, and practiced stalls; put the thrust levers at idle, and tried to hold 35K. Your first stall warning is aural, and we were told to recover on the first indication of a stall. The biggie for this was to NOT get into a secondary stall, so don’t worry about losing the altitude-be more concerned about the secondary stall. Get the nose down to 5 degrees nose low, and don’t touch the thrust until you have a long increasing-airspeed trend arrow, THEN slowly bring in the thrust and start milking the nose up. We both lost around 3K feet, and in the brief were told twice that altitude loss would be more acceptable to a secondary stall.
SPOT 4. This is your V1 cut. The EO SID is a big part of this one. While loading the DEGES 2R SID, on the FPLAN DEPARTURE page bottom middle you will see EO16 or something like that, indicating an EO SID. In PLAN mode on the ND, you will actually see the EO SID. CAUTION: Make sure you are on the correct EO SID page in your JEP; there is one for all the Boeings, then there is one for the A330, 10-7E-1 “Rwys 14/16/32/34 To 330”). During engine failure on takeoff, the EO SID automatically pops up; the PM should insert it ASAP (6R “Tmpy insert”; not sure what happens if you hit 6L “tempy erase” but my guess is it’s not good). You will not do a planned EO go around in the sim, but if you did, there is no pre-built FMS EO SID for the go around (there is a plate under CO 10-7E-3 “All Rwys MA A330”); this you would have to build manually in the secondary, or fly using ground navaids. We did a ‘point-bearing-distance’ exercise in the brief, and our points looked like this: ZUE/212/50 (becomes PBD01), ZUE, ZUE/080/50 (becomes PBD02). Did not build this in the sim. EO landing was uneventful; hand flown, and about the only advice I can give you is bisect the tiny pitch box with the FD bars all the way down (everything else takes care of itself, and when the PM calls runway in sight, glance up, then get right back on the needles to about 20-30 feet (simism but it works). We took our break after this SPOT, and swapped seats on return.
SPOT6. Supposed to be a repeat of SPOT1, but got a left FIRE light and claxon on T/O, and did an RTO (we had briefed we may do the RTO once and count it for both, but not on this takeoff). Only surprise in the sim, and unintentional. As an FO in an FO/FO paired sim, it does not hurt to know the captain’s actions in an RTO for this sim (you can even have them out if needed). Main take away was do your own seat’s duties during the RTO, not the other guys, and also, once the decision to evacuate is made, stop the FIRE ECAM and go to the QRH EVAC checklist. Reset and did SPOT 6 Took off rwy 16, came around to VOR rwy 34; did a soft go around way out, then set up for the RNAV to Rwy 14 to a full stop; this approach is also an energy management exercise, so get down/slow ASAP. (Sort of a repeat of SPOT 1 w/o the ECAM; in fact, we just set up as LSZH/LSZH because we knew we were coming back).
SPOT 7. CAT III approach to a landing. The main thing of this whole spot is to let the FO call “LAND GREEN”. In the left seat, remember to not only go to idle at the right time, but also deploy the thrust reversers (and at some point disconnect the AP)! Uneventful.
SPOT 8. V1 cut off rwy 16, back around for a hand-flown EO CAT I ILS. Uneventful. As the PM, remember to get the EO SID in without any prompting from the PF (also ensure NAV), and tell the PF what the EO accel altitude is so he has a target for level off.
SPOT 9. Combined back in SPOT 6. Whole RTS took 3:45, but all good training.

Day 3-RLE & RAD (C session). Had an excellent check airman for day 3 who put us at ease. Talked about a few things going on, like the paperwork checks in Europe (may want to print out a landing data sheet just to show LHR, who seem to have an issue with ‘standard landing assessment’; to be honest I glazed over at this point as it sounded like captain stuff). Other helpful tips in the brief: enter an airport in the MCDU prior to turning on the IRSs, FCMC reset fixes a world of hurts (there was an IRS/ADR specific problem that led to this discussion), Mode S agreement allows ATC to see what you enter in the FCU (ref selected speed vs. going managed and they know you are slowing down), FA’s handset has to be re-cradled/reset for each call (otherwise when she pushes the call button a second or tenth time it does nothing).
RLE. As published in the guide: PHL to CLT, with forecast diverts in the area. APU is MEL’ed, so you have to do an External Air start, followed by a crossbleed start. We pulled out the checklist (OM 1 Pt 1 pg 578 4.8.1 External Air Start). FO read, Capt moved switches. When it got to the start, FO did the start. Non-event. We pushed into the alleyway at PHL, and did the crossbleed start (pg 580 4.8.2). Big take away was we had the minimum 30psi at idle power. Also, the lower ECAM page with the psi disappears by the time you get to the crossbleed start; quickest way to get it back is to cycle the ignition wafer switch to norm then back to ignition. “Taxiing out” to 09L, there was a runway change to 27L; remember to change your takeoff data for the new runway; if you do nothing at all, you have no takeoff data. As well, if you already accomplished the taxi checklist, re-accomplish it after a runway change/flap change. TO and climbout was uneventful (done by the ‘captain’). ATC told us there was light turbulence between 10 and 23K, so we ran a drill with the FAs telling them severity, time of turbulence, and to implement their ‘light turbulence procedures’ (yes, they have a checklist for that). While overhead KCHO, got an ECAM for ENG 1 IDG Oil LO PR. Ran the ECAM, FO assigned PF duties (flew thru touchdown). There is a follow up procedure (pg 47 in QRH), which will drive you to nearest suitable runway for landing. A couple of things-IDGs are confirm items, and there is a QRH NOTE: ‘Don’t press IDG for more than 3 seconds to avoid damage’. Also, company policy is that anytime you are down to single electrical source ops, you shall declare an emergency. We decided to go to IAD (behind us), and thankfully the weather was better there than BWI or RIC, which were also fairly close. Run all those cool checklists about contacting dispatch (use the SAT phone, may want to review this), tell the people, tell the FAs, get the weather for IAD. Uneventful approach and landing to RWY 19L into IAD. Talking to other guys, I’ve heard that other things you may get are loss of cabin pressure, or your anti-ice system failing (I guess that would determine where you could land). We got repositioned at the gate, then took a break.
RAD. As scripted, but here are some highlights:
SPOT 1. Emergency deplaning at the gate. This was done as a ‘talk thru’. Basically, started the APU at FA’s request, then haze started in the back. Multiple FA calls as haze and smell got worse. Eventually we asked them to do an emergency deplaning. Sometime later, we started getting bells and whistles and a SMOKE AVNCS VENT SMOKE. FO was running the immediate action, when CAPT decided to do an evacuation; quit the QRH procedure for smoke, and start running the evacuation checklist. SPOT over.
SPOT 2. Windshear. FO1 was sitting on the numbers for CLT 36C on BARMY dep (LH turnout); talked about what to do if you got a predictive advisory before takeoff roll started (delay takeoff). Now you’re rolling and get the same thing (check TLs in TOGA). Also, there is a procedure for taking off with crosswinds exceeding 20 knots (OM Pt 1 2d.2.5 pg 207): Full forward stick, slowly releasing between 80-100 knots; and, three TL positions, let it stabilize at 1.1, then stabilize at 1.3, then go FLEX or TOGA, all by 40 knots GS-this helps guard against compressor stalls. On takeoff, got reactive windshear climbing thru 120’RA, right after engaging AP. Left it on AP and called ‘Escape-TOGA’ (when you go ‘Escape-TOGA’, this differs from just ‘go around-TOGA’, as in ‘don’t touch anything on configuration’ ref gear and flaps). Eventually AP kicked off at ALPHA prot; manually followed FDs, and when speed got above VLS, reconnected AP. NOTE: plane will try to turn on you to follow departure, so pull heading knob to level wings. PM eventually called “I think we’re out of it’, and cleaned up on schedule. You end up in TOGA lock (a performance-based condition); if you know how to get out of it skip the next sentence, because I always get this confused with Thrust Lock (a ‘the a/c doesn’t know what to do so it ain’t moving the thrust setting’ condition). To get out of TOGA Lock, match TLs to thrust (should already be in TOGA) and mash the instinctive disconnect buttons on the TLs, place the TLs in the CL detent, and re-engage the ATHR on the FCU.
SPOT 3. We set up on a final to 36C, and got into reactive windshear around 300 feet. I still had the AP on, and it stayed on thru the maneuver. Remember to eventually go NAV for the go around track. Switched seats, and rinsed and repeated. Only difference second time around is that FO2 got his approach windshear closer to the FAF, and had some pretty noticeable AS deviations. On the go around on approach, it will evolve into “I think we are out of it-go around-FLAPS”, etc).
SPOT 4. Night Visual Approach, RWY 34 into Zurich(!). Started by departing GIPOL at 7K and 250 knots, so think about your energy state and getting slowed down at some point. Controller tried to talk us into taking a 3K descent; using our tools at hand (MSAs, TERR ON ND, leg min alts on final’s profile view for the ILS to 34, runway in the prog page for distance), we respectfully declined. Then we got offered 4K (declined), then 5K. While discussing whether we would take 5K, we were cleared visual, so now we can pick our own altitude. Mainly keyed off the MSA chart, and the range rings on the approach plate. We used the ND to setup for a base that came just inside of MILNI (the FAF). We actually mis-read the altitude as 3500’ (we should have been shooting for the MILNI alt of 5K); this put us driving along at sometimes 1100’ RA. Anyway, uneventful landing. About the only thing I would do different is maybe use the raw GS data as part of your reference for what’s a good altitude to descend to (does not in any way guarantee you terrain separation on base, but could be used as a ‘no lower than’ altitude during the base turn and give you a warm fuzzy you’re going to be able to get down using your other altitude decisions). Also, consider what you would do in the unlikely event of a go around-coordinate to use the ILS go around procedures? Finally, have the EO SID handy/built in the secondary for a worst case, night EO go around in Zurich.

Good for another nine months!

 
December 11, 2017

Day 1
FMB: 45 minutes on WSI overview, options, suggestions.
RHF: 1:30 on accidents, incidents led by instructor but emphasis on our input.
RGS: 3:15 on systems, doors, emergency equipment.
Day 2
1:00 security review
FO/FO paired sim. R18. Zurich. Start with Degas2R SID. Followed script on page 11 of CQ Training Guide. T/O Rwy 16, two fuel pumps go out in same tank. PM ran ECAM. Return Zurich, hold, VOR 34. Visibility on all approaches is set to minimums. PM needs to say "approach lights" and PF keeps going. On V1 cut PM needs to insert EO SID immediately without waiting for PF to call for it. Prebrief this.
Day 3
FO/FO paired. R18. KCLT. Followed script on page 17. On RNAV had "GPS PRIMARY LOST" in scratch pad - call out and perform G/A. For visual approach follow guidance on page 2f-7 of OM - 10 miles green dot flaps 1, abeam S speed flaps 2, etc.
Overall - thorough but fair. No surprises. And we don't accept VFR approaches at night.

 
July 1, 2017 (R9)

Everything as scripted in the CQ Training Guide for Day 1 and 2 in the SIM. First day in the SIM, takeoff (BIBTI5D) and approaches to EDDF RWY 07C (VOR 07C, RNAV Z 07C, ILS 07C.) During R9, PHL-CLT, APU was on MEL, and when about to level at F310, IDG #1 OIL OVHT, IDE then disconnected IAW ECAM (confirm item). Without the APU, now single generator, declared an emergency and diverted to IAD, ILS 19L, normal landing for the FAs (initially we were 1,500# overweight and extended the gear early and miraculously burned down to landing weight before we had to run the overweight landing checklist). During RAD, again as scripted, during Automation 1 (hand flying), good exercise using flight path vector (FPV) in CLT.

 
January 24, 2017 (R9)

Pretty much as advertised, PHL - CLT vis 3/4 mi in phl with clt showing moderate icing below 10000. The APU is on MEL. Have the external air start supplemental normal and crossbleed start supplemental ready. See note about briefing the F/As about waiting to start the IFE until after 2nd eng start. Runway change taxiing out so dont forget to rerun the taxi checklist after the 2nd start. The 3 senarios that im aware of are an IDG will overheat requiring disconnect leaving you on one generator forcing a divert to IAD rwy 19L. Engine anti ice ecam is the next possibility with icing in clt forcing the divert. The one we got was a dual pack overheat that wouldnt reset forcing a highdive into IAD. Whichever fault you get youll wind up in IAD for the ILS 19L. For us the packs fail 1 at a time with a chance to cool as per ecam then reset but it overheated again followed shortly by the second pack overheating. Dont waste time with the ecam other than making sure there's no immediate action or ecam exception. just start down asap or the cabin will hit 10,000 before you can get down and be forced to don the masks. If you don't delay you should be able to reach 10,000 just as the cabin reaches 10. Then take your time after that and address the ecams and followups if any, brief 19L, descent appr chklst and youre back in the green and ready for a non event ILS with weather well above cat 1 mins. The training in the second half was straight forward. Windshear shortly after takeoff. Then one around a thousand feet on approach(both reactive). Bumping Vapp up a few knots as per windshear procedures will help you get out easier. A nose high and one nose low unusual attitude. Then about 20 mins of playing around VFR with the flight path vector with autopilot and autothrottle both off. Works great and was actually fun to practice with.

 
January 14, 2017 (R9)

Paired CA/Seat Filler. Everything as scripted in the CQ Training Guide for Day 1 and 2 in the Sim. During R9, PHL-CLT, APU was on MEL, and when about to level at F310, IDG #1 OIL OVHT, IDE then disconnected IAW ECAM (confirm item). Without the APU, now single generator, declared an emergency and diverted to IAD, RWY 19L, normal landing for the FAs. During RAD, again as scripted, during Automation 1 (hand flying), good exercise using flight path vector (FPV).

 
October 31, 2016

Day 1: Ground School Day is as published in Training Guide. Same comments as June 2nd below: Helpful hints on IPAD usage. How to find things fast, bookmarks, snapshots, WSI loading, wx, layers, etc.
- Pretty much everything else as scripted. Landing performance, very brief systems, FM, etc.
- How to load Greenland diversion entry points, terrain clearance routes in IPAD for day 3 RAD in sim.
- Human factors: review some close calls, accidents, talk about good and bad parts.

Day 2: CAP/FO paired, as published in Training Guide. Also reviewed EVACUATION with the change in how it’s accomplished. Started in SIM in Rio with VAKUB 1A to RNAV Y 28 to missed approach by FO (Configure early on STAR). CAP RNAV Y 28 to landing (SIM had us left of centerline). Moved to CLT for Low Vis T/O to CAT III 36C to Missed Approach (above 1000 AFL, used soft go around). Then vectors to CAT III 36C Landing. RNAV 36C by FO and CAP: 1 to Missed Approach, and 1 to Landing. Spot 6, CAP should assign PF to FO and run the ECAM. Spot 7, CAP remains PF and FO runs ECAM. No loading flight plans except as needed for spots. Wind shear on T/O for FO and windshear on approach for CAP.

Day3: CAP/FO paired. First part check ride (RVA) , but low key and as published in Training Guide. All spots again. All CLT 36C. In pre-brief, checked for updated ipad using App Catalog (Current versions of JetFlightPro, WSI, Holdover Time Ap, and A330 Landing Ap) and reviewed the A330 Landing Ap Abnormal Tab.
- Low vis T/O to clean up.
- Cat III approach 36C, first to missed approach (above 1000 AFL again) then autoland (FO - only thing is Land Green).
- RNAV Y 36C, G/A to cleanup or landing.
- V1 cut for FO, V2 cut for CAP, vectors, Capt does ECAM, hand flown Cat 1 ILS to landing.

Then maneuvers training (RAD).
- Greenland, emergency depress, escape routes. Do what you discussed on day 1. We used the masks (clean with wet wipes before flight). Doing it with the masks (always a pain) did make it obvious that you don’t want to be searching through the iPad looking for the depress routes and fixes after the cabin blows. If you have it loaded in the secondary ahead of time and keep it updated as the flight progresses, it makes it very simple to just activate the secondary and do direct to your escape point when below the tracks.
- ADR failures. Capt PF. Lose ADR1 only. Capt loses info. He gives aircraft to F/O. Turns off ADR1 (push), switches to Capt on #3. Then F/O loses #2. Gives aircraft back to Capt. Does ECAM exception. Then switches to F/O on #3 also.
- Little exercise on takeover pushbuttons.
- CLT VFR Cat 1 ILS to max crosswind landing. Swap PF and do it again. Done

 
June 26, 2016

Note - Cafeteria closed on Sunday for B Session.

Day 1: Ground School Day is as published in Training Guide. Same comments as June 2nd below: Helpful hints on IPAD usage. How to find things fast, bookmarks, snapshots, WSI loading, wx, layers, etc.
- Pretty much everything else as scripted. Landing performance, very brief systems, FM, etc.
- How to load Greenland diversion entry points, terrain clearance routes in IPAD for day 3 in sim.
- Human factors: review some close calls, accidents, talk about good and bad parts.

Day 2: CAP/FO paired, as published in Training Guide. In pre-brief, checked for updated ipad (Current versions of JetFlightPro, WSI, Holdover Time Ap, and A330 Landing Ap) and reviewed the A330 Landing Ap Abnormal Tab. Also reviewed EVACUATION with the change in how it's accomplished. Started in SIM in Rio with VAKUB 1A to RNAV Y 28 (but we actually did RNAV Z 28) to missed approach by FO (Configure early on STAR). CAP RNAV Z 28 to landing (SIM had us left of centerline). Moved to CLT for Low Vis T/O to CAT III 36C to Missed Approach. Then vectors to CAT III 36C Landing. RNAV 36C by FO and CAP: 1 to Missed Approach, and 1 to Landing. Spot 6, CAP should assign PF to FO and run the ECAM. Spot 7, CAP remains PF and FO runs ECAM. No loading flight plans except as needed for spots. Wind shear on T/O for FO and windshear on approach for CAP.

Day3: CAP/FO paired. First part check ride (RVA) , but low key and as published in Training Guide. All spots again. All CLT 36C.
- Low vis T/O to clean up.
- Cat III approach 36C, first to missed approach then autoland (FO - only thing is Land Green).
- RNAV Y 36C, G/A to cleanup or landing.
- V1 cut for FO, V2 cut for CAP, vectors, Capt does ECAM, hand flown Cat 1 ILS to landing.

Then maneuvers training (RAD).
- Greenland, emergency depress, escape routes. Do what you discussed on day 1. We used the masks. Doing it with the masks (always a pain) did make it obvious that you don't want to be searching through the iPad looking for the depress routes and fixes after the cabin blows. If you have it loaded in the secondary ahead of time and keep it updated as the flight progresses, it makes it very simple to just activate the secondary and do direct to your escape point.
- ADR failures. Capt PF. Lose ADR1 only. Capt loses info. He gives aircraft to F/O. Turns off ADR1 (push), switches to Capt on #3. Then F/O loses #2.
Gives aircraft back to Capt. Does ECAM exception. Then switches to F/O on #3 also.
- Little exercise on takeover pushbuttons.
- CLT VFR Cat 1 ILS to max crosswind landing. Swap PF and do it again. Done

 
June 2, 2016

Day 1: Helpful hints on IPAD usage. How to find things fast, bookmarks, snapshots, WSI loading, wx, layers, etc.
- Pretty much everything else as scripted. Landing performance, very brief systems, FM, etc.
- How to load Greenland diversion entry points, terrain clearance routes in IPAD for day 3 in sim.
- Human factors: review some close calls, accidents, talk about good and bad parts.

Day 2: FO/FO pair. Exactly as scripted for two f/o's. Rio and CLT. One guy does all the work in the right seat except for reject, then break and swap seats. No loading flight plans except as needed for spots. Notice some small differences like wind shear on t/o first time vs on approach second time.

Day3: FO/FO pair. First part checkride but more like training. Low threat. All spots again. All CLT 36C. All right seat, then swap and do exactly same again.
- Low vis t/o to clean up.
- Cat III approach, autoland (only thing is Land Green).
- RNAV Y 36C, G/A to cleanup.
- V1 cut, vector around, Capt does ECAM, hand flown Cat 1 ILS to landing. Break, swap seats, do again. Checks done.

Then maneuvers training.
- Greenland, emergency depress, escape routes. Do what you discussed on day 1. Didn't use mask, headsets. Say it only. Better able to communicate and learn what they want you to know. Great.
- ADR failures. Capt PF. Lose ADR1 only. Capt loses info. He gives aircraft to F/O. Turns off ADR1 (push), switches to Capt on #3. Then F/O loses #2. Gives aircraft back to Capt. Does ECAM exception. Then switches to F/O on #3 also.
- Little exercise on takeover pushbuttons.
- CLT VFR Cat 1 ILS to max crosswind landing. Swap seats. Do again. Done.
 
January 14, 2016

All 3 days went as advertised and since we had a B session SIM, we had security on the 2nd day after the SIM. Make sure to review the slides for RTS (day 2 – 1st day in SIM) and R9 for the last day.

On the R9, LOE, we taxied out for runway 9L on the published PHL-FCO leg, but had a runway change to 27L. Everything was normal and out of FL180 he slewed us out to the track west of 50o West, at FL350, talking to Gander Radio. Then our two MCDUs went blank leaving us only the 3rd MCDU on the pedestal. We looked up in the QRH and tried the procedure on page 27, MCDU Locked or Blank without success. Again in the QRH, page 103, ETOPS System Failures and found that proceeding across the ocean was not permitted. We were still in VHF contact, so we reestablished radar contact and got a clearance for a 180. Then we used the SAT phone to call IOC and suggested that since we had a heavy airplane and plenty of fuel that we proceed back to PHL, which is what we did. We were slewed back to PHL for a ILS 27R. That was the end of our LOFT leg. -BREAK- Next we were in Zurich for windshear and EGPWS training. Again, all as scripted in the A330 Training Guide for Continuation Training, Revision 3. Finally, he slewed us out to mid ocean and gave us CARGO SMOKE. We did the checklist and quickly descended below the tracks and began a divert to Lajes and as soon as we were established he slewed us to final for the ILS 15, and we called it a day.

 
October 31, 2015

We had the departure delay scenario in PHL. We taxied on one engine and when we came to a stop I was ready to shut down the other engine when our delay was lifted and we departed. Needed to use engine AI on the climb out but all else was normal. Out of FL180 he slewed us out to the track right a the coast out point at FL350. Then our two MCDUs went blank leaving us only the 3rd MCDU on the pedestal. We looked up in the QRH and found that proceeding across the ocean was not permitted. We were still in VHF contact, so we got a clearance to Gander and a decent. Then we used the SAT phone to call IOC and suggested that since we had a heavy airplane and beaucoup fuel and really little wrong with the jet that we proceed back to PHL, which is what we did. That was the end of our LOFT leg. -BREAK- Next we were in Zurich for windshear and EGPWS training. I got a takeoff reactive windshear at 800 feet and upon recovery we did the EGPWS event, then the F/O got a reactive windshear at about 200 feet on approach. On the miss we flew back out to the mountains and he did his EGPWS. Finally, he slew us out to mid ocean and gave us CARGO SMOKE. We did the checklist and began a divert to Lages and as soon as we were established he put us on the ground and we called it a day.

The Hyatt House is very nice. My room had a kitchette, separate living room with big flat screen, and a real nice bedroom with another flat screen. The only minus I can say is that it is amid a cluster of hotels, but no restaurants aside from eating at the hotels. We walked across Billy Graham Parkway (no sidewalk) and came upon the Sterling Hotel area. We ate a McKoys, a sports bar. Great Shrimp Grits!

 
September 8, 2015

Day 1 in the SIM went as scripted in the CQ Guide and the RTS Briefing Slides on Wings.

Day 2 in the SIM started the R9 Briefing Slides (including the exact the System Evaluation questions from the slides) on Wings. Then we did the LOE 1, KPHL-LIRF, loft leg. Everything was normal and real time during departure, climb, and cruise until after receiving the Oceanic Clearance. Once we were set up for the oceanic portion, we were repositioned to east of 50W. Our event (trigger) for the divert was Cargo Smoke. The Captain worked the QRH while the FO diverted to the nearest suitable airfield (CYYT). While accomplishing the QRH remember that the Cargo Smoke DISCH PBS is a “Confirmed” item. We accomplished the ECAM, then QRH SMOKE AFT/BULK CARGO SMOKE follow-up (page 8), then the QRH Emergency Landing Checklist (inside back cover, page I), and then the Overweight Landing (page 95). After the QRH checklists, remember the normal checklists, then we did a normal uneventful landing.

Next, the RAD portion went as scripted in the CQ Guide and the R9 Briefing Slides.

 
August 22, 2015

First and foremost print off/refer to the QC A330 Training Guide on Wings/Flight Ops/Pilot Training. It gives you an accurate and essentially verbatim overview for your training to include:
1.) an RTS Briefing Guide for the spots on Sim day 1;
2.) the Flight Plan, TPS, Closeout, and Weather for your RLE (think LOFT) on Sim day 2;
3.) the spots for your Advanced Training (RAD) on Sim day 2, as well as slides on a few, but not all, SPV questions. The big difference from years past is that there is only one loft leg, the “RLE”, on Sim day 2.

Day 1. Ground School starts at 9:15. After the classroom Systems review plan to head downstairs for doors and security training. This was followed by a Human Factors discussion upstairs that involved a frank discussion of industry accidents and events. This was not a snooze but actually worthwhile. Our Systems instructor was excellent. He had a simple presentation on Remote Tuning (OM2 15.2.2 RMP) which came up during our RAD diversion scenario on Sim day 2 for a FM 1&2 Failure. Unless you’re totally up to speed on it, you might consider a short discussion of “Back Up NAV” (ref “NAV B/UP” on “MCDU MENU” page 1, 1L), and use of Remote Tuning with your ground school instructor. You will need it if you are given a FM1&2 FAIL ECAM in the Sim, which is one of the scenarios. We got it and I hear others have as well. (I’m glad we saw it – was good training.) We also walked through the basic Landing Config-Approach Speed & Landing Distance problem that ended up being used during our RTS. Consider going to Perf Manual 6.3 for a review. It is no longer in the back of the QRH. For your problem, slide over to page 6-8 (iPad page 131 along the bottom) and select A-330-200 “ENG” field, then “ENG” A33-200 With Reverser(s)” (pg 6-11) to get started. Proceed to pages 6-17, 6-18, 6-19, and 6-20 to complete your problem. Note that VLS corrections are made for Flaps Full. Only after all corrections are made do you select Config 3 for your single-engine approach speed.

Day 2. We stayed extremely close, if not exactly as published, to the maneuvers and sequence published in the RTS Briefing Guide from Wings. OM Vol 1, Chapter 2d through 2i, has the procedures and callouts for each spot. Regarding Non-ILS approaches see Note #1 on bottom of QRH OD-10 that allows crews to use published MDA mins in lieu of DDA if runway is served by a VASI or PAPI (in other words, no need to add 50’ to MDA). Depending on your show time, you will do some security training either before or after your sim. Instruction during the RTS brief and simulator was quickly paced – busy, but not really rushed. Instruction was excellent I thought. I felt like this guy was really interested in helping and not hammering us. I came away having learned instead of just trying to get through the day.

Day 3. We had only one LOE leg, which was Philadelphia to Rome as published in the QC Training Guide. During taxi out our departure runway was changed from a TOGA 9L take-off to a flex on 27L. Ground Control tried to distract us during taxi at hotspots and runway crossings. After completing data changes for the new runway, departure and climb was uneventful. At cruise we were slewed out to a point well short of 50W, where we received an “Autoflight FM 1&2 Failure” ECAM. In our case we had a successful reset of the FM1 CB. Our diversion airport was St. John’s, NFLD, where the F/O flew an ILS 29 via Remote Tuning. Much like RTS the day before, the RAD portion of the session went as published in the QC Training Guide. The Reactive Windshear was handled nicely by the autopilot, from which we proceeded directly into the EGPWS. Remember that during the “Unreliable Speed Indication/ADR Check” spot that who’s ever flying, probably F/O, will have no Autopilot or Autothrust. PF will need to maintain reasonable hand-flown pitch & power settings while PM is working the checklist. About 68% power and 4-5 degrees pitch worked for us. The Crew Upset spot was surprisingly violent. Our last spot consisted of a diversion to LPLA due to cargo smoke. PF should not delay in starting the off-track diversion as you will have a red LAND ASAP ECAM annunciation. Once the ECAM was completed and we were turned toward LPLA the diversion was terminated. The “Departing Track – Contingencies” portion the Atlantic Reference Guide that we get with the paperwork on our trips is a good reference.

Overall, I liked the new format quite a bit. That Security stuff on day two was a pain as I’d rather be using that time to study or rest. But, the instruction was great and I came away with stuff I can use on the line.


 
August 13, 2015

Day 1: Quick day. Good review. Shed some info for Days to come.

Day 2: Review questions on Airbus Driver link that pertains to the new CQT. Nothing else was asked also review limitations. Good to have Check Airmen review ECAM procedures for your personal review before entering sim. RTS Briefing Guide Page 8 is done exactly as written. No surprises. Two hour Security will follow or start your day depending on what sim session you have..

Day 3: A few questions were asked from review questions and walk around slides. PHL-FCO taxi 9l runway change 27L short reroute taxi for clearance reroute with delay. After T/O Fast forward to start of track. Had FM 1 & 2 failure (Another one is Dual FMGEC failure). It's all ECAM procedure with follow up to page 100. Both have you divert. Review off track procedures. Diverted to CYYT via dispatch request. Weather good. .. Use satcomm for dispatch. HF for Gander. Dual FM failure reverts navigation to Back Up Nav. Any fix entered has to be lat/long. Used an arrivial fix from CYYT arrivial page to get Lat/Long for CYYT guidance. Aircraft is high need to descend ASAP. ECAM calls for RNP usage. Review how to use. Aircraft will be over weight. Short break then Did SPOTS ZURICH. Capt windshear T/O, FO landing to go around. Both do GPWS demo mountain avoidance recovery from level 6000 to 14000. Run arcs out to 40 to see what altitude will clear. Each does upset recovery (note you think it's the sim going wacky but that is your maneuver). Unreliable Airspeed spot review QRH. You're Fast forwarded to 30 w for another off track maneuver with a smoke aft/bulk cargo smoke divert to LPO. Once off track and QRH Exceptions procedure complete should be complete no landing.

NOTES: Use company phraseology exactly as written. Don't embellish. Big on PM duties and phraisiology. Review Confirm procedures. On EVAC (cabin door is only ground confirm so no confirm procedures are needed on ground for all others). Call up IRO from break and use them. Pay attention to what is said from ground and check airman. They don't leave any stone unturned. Whatever is in the ride is covered, sometimes suddle, but covered. Good Session!!!!!

 
July 13, 2015

Make sure you go to Wings/Flight Ops/Pilot Training and download the A330 Training Guide Continuing Qualification Guide (also on iPad). This booklet explains the new format for our training and contains a dispatch release, TPS, track message, weather, etc. for the RLE. You’ll also find the A330 RTS and R9 training guides on the Pilot Training Wings page. They’re basically the slide shows that you’ll get during your sim briefings and part of the SPV-limitations questions. Note that Ground School on day 1 begins at 9:15.

Day 1 Ground school classroom covers adverse weather, emergency/abnormal performance problems (from section 6 of the Performance Manual), instruments, navigation, abnormal procedures (OM 1, Ch 9), communications, auto flight, and EGPWS. Then you’ll head downstairs for emergency equipment and door training. There is no programmed lunch break for the day but everybody has been ending up with about 15 minutes after door training to grab a sandwich before the next class starts. That program covers takeoff and landing minimums from the FM, some of which are found in the OD pages. This was followed by Human Factors. I thought this was a great presentation based on ASAPs, P2s, LOSAs, and FOQA data and I think it’s a valuable addition to our training. We were done by 3:30.

Day 2 If you have a C or D session, you’ll have Security training before your sim. For A and B sessions, the training will be following your sim. (For my B, it was 4:45) As you notice in your RTS briefing guide (from the afore mentioned Training Guide) there is no reference as to where the SPOT work is accomplished. 1 and 2 are in SXM and 3-6 are in CLT. It’s a full day of training but it’s not rushed and the instruction is excellent. You’ll look at unreliable airspeed and undue activation of alpha prot procedures. When you’re comparing ADRs to find the bad one(s), stop climbing while checking out airspeeds and altitudes against the GPS. Also note the ADRs are numbered 1-3-2 not 1-2-3 so you don’t shut off the wrong one. The last spot will cause an evacuation. (Ours was a report from the F/As on final that there was thick smoke in the cabin.) The evacuation checklist has changed a bit in the last year so take a look at it.

Day 3 The RLE is PHL-FCO. We started out for 9L (TOGA) but the runway changed to 27L (Flex). Once at altitude, you’re slewed onto the track. At this point, there are several triggers to cause a diversion. Ours was Autoflight FM1&2 failure. CYYT was the closest alternate and weather was good for the hand flown ILS overweight landing. Following the RLE is advanced training (RAD) which is essentially SPOTS. The last one is an off track diversion due to Cargo Smoke which I hear can also be used as a trigger on the RLE.

I would suggest putting some time into studying instruments/navigation and alternate law to better understand FM and ADR issues. If learning is enhanced by the mistakes you make, then I’m on my way to genius status. It was great training and our instructors are top notch.