A320 LINE PILOT CQ SIMULATOR COMMENTS


URGENT: PLEASE SEND CQT SIM INTEL ASAP! I really need your input on the SPOTS, LOFT, and non-normal events that occurred during your ride so I can construct a new matrix of the scenario events and triggers. Please send me a summary of your CQ experiences in the simulator to: busdriver@hky.com

 

This page is a summary of the comments forwarded to me by the line pilots after completing their CQ training event. The material presented is in it's raw form as submitted to me for your review. As the program progresses and changes are implemented, it is vital I receive feedback to update the SPOT and LOFT scenarios. If you encounter any differences or additions as related to your sim experience, just jot them down in an Email and send it my way: busdriver@hky.com I'll post it anonymously to share with the group ...

 

RTS SUMMARY

1. Single-engine taxi
2. Low Visibility Takeoff, CAT II Autoland (CA) and Landing
3. Takeoff with Gusts, VOR Approach, Pneumatics, Air Conditioning, and Pressurization Non-Normal, Landing with Gusts, (CA)
4. Takeoff, Engine Failure (Second Segment), Single Engine CAT I ILS Approach, Landing, (FO)
5. Takeoff, Engine Failure/Fire (Between V1 and V2), Single Engine CAT I ILS Approach, Landing, (CA)
6. Gusty Crosswind Takeoff, Electric Non-Normal, RNAV (RNP) AR 13R Approach, Gusty Crosswind Landing, (FO)
7. LOC Approach 22R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing, (FO)
8. KORD ILS 10R PRM APPROACH AND BREAKOUT

MO SUMMARY

1. CA Low Visibility Takeoff, KMCO ILS CAT III 36R Approach, Landing
2. FO Low Visibility RTO, Low Visibility Takeoff, KMCO RNAV (GPS) 36L Approach, Landing
3. FO Engine Failure Second Segment Climb, Single Engine Pattern, Go-Around\Missed Approach, KMCO CAT I ILS 36R, Landing
4. CA Takeoff with Gusts, Hydraulic Failure, KMCO LOC 36R Approach, Go-Around/Missed Approach, Landing
5. CA Engine Failure at V1, Single Engine KMCO CAT I ILS 36R Landing
6. KDFW-KEGE Departure, SID, Door Non-Normal
7. DFW RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 13 Approach, Missed Approach
8. KDFW 18L Takeoff, Departure, Brakes Non-Normal
9. KDFW 18L Visual Approach, Gusty Winds
10. KEGE LDA 25 Visual Approach to Uncontrolled Field, Go Around, Visual Pattern and Landing

RAD SUMMARY

1. Unreliable Airspeed
2. Windshear/Microburst on Takeoff and Approach KLAS - FO on Takeoff prior to VR 26R, CA on Approach 26L
3. KLAS 26R Takeoff/ SID/ Upset Recovery (FO), Manually Controlled Slow Flight/Recovery from Full Stall (Both)
4. Upset Recovery (Maneuver Based)
5. Manually Controlled Instrument Arrival and Upset Recovery
6. High Altitude, High Energy Go Around

LOE SUMMARY

Either:

DCA - BOS
BOS - DCA

  NOTES
F/A briefing - FM
Know your flows and callouts
Load alternate fuel on INIT B page, routing + approach
Review Company pages
Review MELs
Brief taxi route, hotspots, and TPS performance
Route + Arrival verification / check re-routes
All lights on when crossing runways, "Clear left, clear right"
TCAS: "Autopilot Off, Flight Directors OFF"
Monitor 121.5
RSVM Altitude cross check at level off
When diverting, talk to ATC, OCC (use Air Cell phone), F/As, pax
Recruise by inserting same cost index
Landing gear down - check triple indicator
Monitor Autobrakes

  LINE PILOT FEEDBACK

The
new CQT Scenario Cycle began January 1, 2022

Note: I just found about this change today. The new cycles used to start every March 1st. I will be working on the summaries above over the next several days, so please be patient. One of your peers just submitted an excellent intel debrief on the new scenarios which I have added below on January 12th.


Your CQ Line Pilot Comments will be placed here ...

 
January 12, 2022

The CQT cycle now changes on January 1; the change over used to be March 1.

The biggest hassle we had was a lack of information and a heads up to this change. Also the fact that this CQT cycle is utterly the definition of trying to "stuff 10 pounds into a 5 pound bag".
It took a lot of effort working with The APA Training Committee during the holidays to get the ground school slides posted about ten days out from the beginning of the cycle and then the training guide a few days after that.

As of January 11 there are still no Systems Validations Questions available on aaPilots. During my follow-up with The APA training committee there appears to be a possibility that training has decided to no longer publish those for review before your LOE.

However, for our LOE the Validation Questions were the same set of performance problems that were used for the last CQT cycle.

The day 1 ground school is straight forward. It is well worth your time to review the ground school systems slides on aaPilots. Many times the slides will cover the events you will encounter on the LOE and will also cover many of the spots on the RTS, MO and RAD.

The ground school slides cover the following failures:

SMOKE FWD/AFT Cargo Smoke
NAV ADR 1 Fault
FMGC 1 Fault
NAV RA 1 Fault

For our LOE we had a NAV ADR 2 Fault.

I gleaned in conversations that one of the three LOE scenarios involves a diversion. The ground school slides spend a lot of time covering an ECAM Cargo Smoke on a flight from LAX to JFK with KABE and KPHL alternates (the exact eastbound LOE flight). Years ago with this system in the recurrent cycle I had this ECAM during a LOE with an immediate return to the airport. I find it highly probable that this may be the diversion scenario. Because of this I had taken the time to review the Cargo Smoke ECAM follow-up and familiarize myself as to where the related switches are (Cargo Isolation Valves).

Just food for thought until we have more debriefs, in years past LOE I have also had these related faults:

A single FAC, FAC 1 + 2, single ELAC, single FWC, FWS SDAC 1, Yaw Damper 1 + 2, CA PFD and FCU 1.

The training guide is in a new format with hyper links. It also no longer publishes that handy chart showing who was going to be doing what maneuver and in what order. Word is that training is trying to impart more unpredictability into the sim flights. I am not convinced that enhances learning because with so much to do you end up just holding onto the tail of a tiger for an endurance test.

There is however a scenario chart in the RTS briefing slides that can be printed out. The RAD maneuvers went in the order as published in the training guide, the MO not as much. The training guide also indicates the spots to be flown and a list of approaches so you can preload your iPod and review. I highly recommend that you do that because there is no time to spare in the simulator with this CQT cycle.

RTS

The RTS day was very similar to the last cycle with some added maneuvers and approaches just to make sure that you use every single second of your allotted four hour sim time:

CA Ready on JFK runway 22R for a normal T/O (no taxi nonsense)
JFK 13L CAT II to a published missed approach
JFK 13L CAT II to a landing

CA Runway 22R takeoff
JFK LOC 22R approach to a missed approach
JFK LOC 22R approach to a landing
(This approach has a 2.5 degree course offset from the runway)

CA Runway 22R takeoff
During vectors an IDG overheat that quickly turns into a IDG failure
JFK RNAV (RNP) 13R to a landing

FO Runway 22R takeoff
During vectors ECAM VENT Blower Fault (I believe)
JFK VOR 31L approach to a landing
(This approach has 29 degree course offset from the runway)

FO Runway 22R takeoff
(2) JFK RNAV (RNP) Z 31L with missed approach for windshear: (1) Predictive (1) Reactive

Break

CA Runway 22R takeoff
Eng 2 Fire/Fail after liftoff
CA accomplishes ECAM and Fix/Non-Normal procedure
JFK ILS 31R with the AP/OFF, FD/ATHR - ON to a landing

FA Runway 22R takeoff
Eng 2 Fire/Fail between V1 and V2
FO accomplishes ECAM and Fix/Non-Normal procedure
JFK ILS 31R with the AP/OFF, FD/ ATHR - ON to a landing

CA Runway 22R takeoff
Predictive windshear Advisory (ND windshear Icon only) prior to V1:

- TOGA, and continue the takeoff
- Above 400' AGL maneuver to avoid the windshear

Another takeoff with Reactive windshear once airborne:

- "Escape, TOGA, My Aircraft"
- Fly the windshear escape profile wings level straight ahead with no config change

BOTH Bounced landing recovery from a visual approach to runway 22R

- "TOGA"
- Mind your pitch
- "Go-around flaps" (this will stop the takeoff config warning)
- Rotate at Vapp
- With a safe rate of climb, gear up
- Normal clean up reaching 1000' AGL

Besides the windshear and bounced landing the past debriefs cover the RTS day very well. The LOC approach has also changed from JFK 31R to JFK 22R.

MO

The MO day was odd to me in that it was as much of a RTS type training day as a "check ride" day.

We really didn't miss a beat but it again took up every moment of our allotted four hours to get this 10 pound MO stuffed into this 5 pound bag.

It was more difficult to take accurate notes for the MO but this is what I remember.

Most of the MO uses KMCO runway 36R using the ILS, LOC or RNAV approach. Then you switch to KLAS for stalls and the EO SID drill followed by a spot landing at KJAC to a rejected landing after touchdown.

Again, most of the KMCO events are similar as the last cycle MO:

CA KMCO 36R low visibility takeoff
T/O alternate drill
EPCOT 2 RNAV Departure to about 7000' then a return to go back and get Robert
MCO ILS 36R CAT III to a landing

FO F/O 1600 RVR take off to a rejected T/O

- I don't remember what we rejected for but it wasn't a crazy try to take you off the runway due to a reverser deployment. I want to say it was a subtle lost of power to an engine failure without a fire. I recall that my first indication of a problem was a yaw without an immediate ECAM.

FO MCO 36R takeoff
MCO LOC 36R to a landing

FO MCO 36R takeoff
Engine fail after takeoff
MCO ILS 36R with the AP/ OFF, FD/ATHR - ON to a missed approach
MCO ILS 36R with the AP/ OFF, FD/ATHR - ON to landing

CA 36R takeoff
EPCOT 2 Departure
During climb a HYD Y LO LVL ECAM (the Land App is accomplished during the briefing slides)
MCO RNAV (GPS) 36R to a missed approach
MCO RNAV (GPS) 36R to a landing

CA 36R takeoff
Engine fail after liftoff
Indications were that we could attempt a relight but were told not to
MCO ILS 36R with the AP/ OFF, FD/ATHR - ON to landing

Break

BOTH Airborne re-position to LAS to fly both high and low altitude stalls

FO LAS 26R takeoff on the NIITZ 2 RNAV Departure
EO SID for runways 26R loaded into the SEC FPLAN
Normal takeoff
At around 1000' AGL engine 2 starts to compressor stall/recover/stall causing on and off yaw
"Heading, activate secondary, NAV"
Declare "Mayday"
CA accomplishes the QRH ENG STALL non-normal procedure
FO (PF) flies the EO SID
Advancing the THR LVR 2 the stall returns
Leave THR LVR 2 at IDLE
Vectors for the LAS ILS 26R to a landing

BOTH Re-position to KJAC
Set up for the KJAC ILS Z 19 visual approach from over DNW VOR
Spot land in the first 1000' of the runway (basically "the numbers")
After touchdown perform the rejected/balked landing go-around:

- "TOGA"
- Mind your pitch
- "Go-around flaps" (this will stop the takeoff config warning)
- Rotate at Vapp
- With a safe rate of climb, gear up
- Normal clean up reaching 1000' AGL

LOE: LAX - JFK

We each got a straight forward performance problem from the last cycle.

Twice we were each asked to pick a walk-around point for your sim partner to answer.

The training guide MEL and Release MEL do not match. That is because the training guide MEL is now a NEF. You can plan on using the release MEL 21-4A Blower Fan INOP. This is just a MEL verification exercise and does not affect the flight: logbook placard, MIC, MEL sticker on the blower switch, blower switch off (none of which you will have found done in the sim logbook or overhead switch).

Brief the F/A, especially the turbulence briefing and mention the Covid briefing. I started the whole Covid P.A. and was asked to please stop.

We had a normal pushback from gate 48A onto C with the tail west. Two engine taxi out C9 and B to hold short of F for a runway 25L takeoff. You may have noticed in the training guide docs LAX ATIS C with 25R closed for inspection and LAX ATIS D with 25L open. You guessed it; once we completed the Before Takeoff checklist we were given new ATIS D to expect a runway 25R departure. Complete the change of runway drill followed by the running Before Takeoff checklist again. Cleared for takeoff full length from runway 25R.

We had briefed a threat that it might be tough to make the crossing restriction at DOCKR at or above 10,000'. Sure enough, it was going to be very close at DOCKR once told to proceed on a left turn direct. We asked for relief from ATC and were told to do the best we can.

We had a couple of altitude changes followed by a climb and maintain clearance to FL270. ATC gave us a heads up on reports of moderate turbulence ahead so I briefed the F/A to stay seated, call me when you are seated, making it clear that I would call them to get up, followed by a P.A. to the passengers.

No sooner was that accomplished we encountered what I would call light turbulence; therefore, I didn't send an ACARS report to dispatch. That generated a minor debrief item. Consider any turbulence of the moderate variety.

Reaching the BLAZN fix on the ORCKA5 departure the C/A took the sim and repositioned us outside of LZV VOR on the LENDY6 arrival into JFK.

We were then cleared to cross JENNO at FL230. As we started our arrival prep we got an ECAM for a NAV ADR 2 Fault. My F/O and I had pre-agreed that he would fly the leg so he was already PF. By the time we went through the ECAM/fix procedure we were with JFK approach.

Here are my takeaways on the NAV ADR 2 Fault:

1) It is no big deal
2) DO NOT get confused and turn an IR - OFF
3) ADR switches are not a confirmation item
4) F/O ADR Data gets switched from NORM to F/O 3 (the standby ADR)
5) ADR faults DO NOT affect your RNAV (GPS) or RNAV (RNP) capability
6) Only ADIRU faults (IR's) effects RNAV capability: 2 IR in NAV mode (GPS) or 3 IR in NAV mode (RNP)

However, do notice on the release that the aircraft for this flight is only SEL 8 RNAV (GPS) approach capable.

We were given vectors around to the east side of the airport, as JFK does, to a RNAV (GPS) 22R approach to a landing. We started to slow to be stable and config early. ATC didn't like that and asked us to maintain 170 knots to the FAF. Once we got down the road a piece we were given speed our discretion before the FAF.

With the displaced threshold (the runway barely meets Standard Landing Data criteria) we exited at K3 to taxi via K to hold short of runway 31L. Set the park brake and the LOE was done.

If you have the west bound JFK - LAX flight I gleaned that the DEEZZ5 departure is flown to the CANDR intersection and then repositioned to DNERO on the ANJLL4 arrival into LAX.

We took a break to get ready to put the 10 pound RAD into a 5 pound.

RAD

The RAD went in order to the maneuvers as listed in the training guide:

BOTH KIAD 19C takeoffs without the FD on to a recovery to ATHR/FD/AP - ON

FO IAD 19C takeoff
FMGC single fault that leads to a FMGC dual fault that leads to RMP backup NAV tuning
Followed by a MCDU Backup NAV demonstration
This takes a LOT of time to work through the FMGC QRH Non-Normal methodology

BOTH Slow flight demo followed by high altitude stall recovery

FO IAD 19C takeoff with ADR 3 on "MEL"
At around 100' start getting indications of unreliable airspeed
Work through the QRC/QRH to determine that all ADR's are unreliable
This leads to flight using the BUSS
Reposition outside of the FAF for a visual approach to KIAD 19C
Configure for a landing using the BUSS to a landing

CA Reposition outside of the FAF for a visual approach to KIAD 19C
Configure for a landing using the BUSS to a landing

FO DCA runway 1 takeoff at MTOW
Just prior to V1 a slow roll back of ENG 2 thrust that leads to a THR LVR Fault ECAM
Rejected takeoff that will have you stopping in about the last 500' of runway.

FO DCA runway 1 takeoff with1600 RVR
EO SID loaded
Engine fail after liftoff
"Heading, activate secondary, NAV"
PF flies the EO SID

Meanwhile ...

CA Accomplishes ECAM & FIX procedure
ATC: "Say your intentions"
What is the weather at Dulles?
Close to CAT III minimums
Proceed to KIAD
Load and brief the KIAD ILS 19C CAT III SINGLE approach
without the QRH Blue OD page briefing
KIAD ILS 19C CAT III SINGLE Autoland single engine to a landing and rollout.
Remember; A320 Autoland single engine Flaps Full with idle reverse during rollout

In case you were not counting that's 10 individual Spots.

This CQT cycle takes all the available sim time. The simulator was having a hard time successfully resetting from so many odd scenarios, which adds time. Our SIM P and C/A were great. I never felt under the gun. They want you to succeed but it will help tremendously if you show up prepared. There really is next to no time in these CQT sessions for a "do over".

My recommendations along with a standard review of flows, call-outs, QRH OD approach procedures and the ECAM/FIX methodology are the following:

Review the ground school slides
Review the prior cycle Airbus Driver debriefs for the RTS and MO day, they are very similar.
Look at the Engine Stall QRH procedure
Review the EO SID procedures; you will do them twice (LAS & DCA)
Review the SMOKE AFT/FWD Cargo Smoke QRH procedure

Training is also imparting engine failures scenarios outside of the standard anticipated V1 and just after V2 regime. We got several.

The LOE looks to happen in two parts: Taxi out with the SID and the STAR to an approach. There appears to not be an enroute portion. Think about where you would divert to going either direction once on the SID. If you had a return to the departure airport it would be a overweight landing.

The ground school slides talk about diverting into KABE on the Cargo Smoke drill (one of the two alternates on the LAX - JFK LOE). Yet in ground school their slide selects KPHL. Your choice of course ...

The last two items may be the most important.

This CQT cycle is overloaded and has reached critical mass. That has no hope of changing unless the line pilots file APA training debriefs to that effect. Along with why the Validations Questions have now become top secret.

1) File your APA Training Committee Debrief
2) File your Airbus Driver debrief

All the best!

Previous 2021 Cycle Scenarios Below
November 22, 2021

All 3 sim days went as previously briefed The only items we had slightly different was our CKA were adamant on the SOP verbatim calls, such as setting altitude (ex:"5k set," "5k") call, both pilots point and confirm the altitude (minimums no contact or minimizing runway in sight, etc); as well as the tps numbers they want specific "—— pounds under ptow, winds blah blah, temp blah. ," if RA on the tps state "2RA in fwd" if none then don't mention.
November 22, 2021

DFW training center recurrent Loft.
Was expecting DCA-BOS got BOS-DCA . Felt rushed to get off gate paperwork is not arranged as normal, hard to digest quickly. Make sure to look at all of it beforehand. Taxi and takeoff as previously reported. Turbulence. IDG disconnect. APU works. Continue to DCA . River Visual FMS 19. Tower calls go around due to airplane on runway. Vectors back to land on 1. Standard assessment on both.
October 26, 2021

Day 1
Standard classroom activities, although for some odd reason the DFW Flight Academy was kept uncomfortably cold. Very unusual.

Day 2
(General Sim tip: To better keep track of "what's next," consider printing a "copy and paste" sheet from this website with the Spots for each day, especially as the instructors tend to rush these things. No need to be in the dark.)

Repeated emergencies into and out of JFK. In the rush of what seems like a dozen Emergency approaches to every runway, it is very easy to forget the company EO Missed Approach pages on the Runway 31 approaches: be sure to keep them in mind for briefing and SE MAP purposes.

We had Sim 6 for all three days, a peach--very easy to land and handles engine failures with aplomb. Culminated with an ORD descending "breakout" maneuver, with an RA as well, CA first, and then repeated by FO.

Day 3
Lots of MCO departures and arrivals, with similar emergency events as Day 2. Subsequent flights were out of DFW so we just created an Jepp flight from DFW to EGE. Oddly, we didn't fly the whole approach, just being sim-positioned to outside the FAF for the LDA 25 approach, which was discontinued due to GA traffic on the runway. Then the best solution is to transition to the left visual pattern, as depicted in the company pages. Click off the AP and fly it manually when the vis is sufficient. Take a close look at it beforehand. Otherwise uneventful.

Day 4
CKA was mellow and placed us at ease, quite the opposite of any experiences at American Eagle for those that had the misfortune of ever flying there.

A few items of note: while you're not actually in a real airplane, on a real flight, the better you can pretend at you are is a key element to help your CKA's eyes water with joy. Almost forgot my standard "Galley Rally" in First Class with all the FA's. Cover turbulence, and it's especially apropos to SHOW them the WSI map with the color coded turbulence. Likewise, "Cart and two FA's for ANY door openings; be sure to yell 'Door, Door, Door' if anyone gets up; positive control of the door--as in 'someone's hand on the door at all times.' Also, if there's anything we need to know, don't hesitate to call us, even in sterile period (ref: AA Flight 300, our 2019 A321 hull loss, something we've STILL not been briefed on!)"

We hoped for DCA to BOS as that's what we had focused on in our studies, and that's what we got. So many briefing items to cover on the flight deck, and non-standard from other airports, especially noting FMA "NAV in Blue" before TO, and "Green at 200 feet" as well. Surprisingly, despite all this we still got off the gate on time. FO's should stay "heads up" until out of the alley as the greater threat there is traffic and congestion. Verbalized and started both engines on push back due to congestion and potentially short taxi time to Rwy 01. Tip: Given how much of a pain it can be to swipe to the correct app, and then find the correct page, consider printing out the flight plan, or at least writing down the important items you'll need on taxi out.

Send an ACARS pirep to Dispatch re: turbulence at altitude, and that you're now cruising at FLxxx. Be sure to brief the FA on an ATC report of "Moderate turbulence ahead, as just reported by another aircraft; execute 'Moderate turbulence procedures.'" Follow that up with a PA for pax to be seated. That was soon followed by an IDG overheat, with a subsequent APU Fault so divert to JFK was a no-brainer move, plus it's directed by the IDG follow up items in the QRH. Consider/discuss the prospect of then losing your last generator, so don't dawdle. Expect a very rushed approach so some timesaving moves include using the ACARS to type a short note to dispatch that you're "Diverting to JFK due to being on last Generator." There's an ETA block already on that ACARS page as well--so useful.

The rushed approach is probably just to see what steps you'll take to unload/de-task yourself and your FO so request an immediate descent from cruise altitude, ADVISE ATC (not a request) that you'll be slowing to 250 KIAS, request long vectors to final, but the reality is that despite all that, they probably want you to demonstrate your stellar ability to intercept a GS from above, which was just briefed to you a few hours earlier: Set an altitude above your current altitude, initially select 1500-1800 FPM down, and then adjust to 2,000 if needed (which it probably will). Be sure you've armed the Approach, of course! ALERT: they may distract you with a heading pull, or some other FMA maneuver, to get the approach to disarm! Keep the light on in the approach button and keep checking your FMA's. Talk outloud to your crewmate to do the same--it's a huge potential "Gotcha." The aircraft is in a steep descent toward the ground and you need to be paying serious attention to this . . . . You're supposed to remain in "Speed Mode," but, technically, you can be in an Open Descent as long as you're above 2,000' AGL, and outside the FAF, but why take the risk of blowing through that 2,000' limit when you're so busy? Gear, flaps, and speed brakes work well--all sims are A320's so no "ding" for using speed brakes with Flaps 3, unlike the A321. If all of this isn't sufficient, just request more vectors, a 360-turn, etc. Retaining high SA about your descent, checklist status, landing clearance (or not), is key to a successful checkride. Despite all this, here's really no rush as this is a benign "emergency," and even if there was a hurry, ensure the airplane will ONLY get down at a rate that you and your crew can handle safely. Be determined to take care of your airplane and pax--ATC is here for you, not the other way around, so just make it happen.

Land, taxi clear, and ride over. We were commended for an excellent ride, working well as a crew, etc., but he probably says that to all this pilots.

Snack Break and additional training on a host of maneuvers for the second half. Tip for high-altitude stall recovery: use the top of red airspeed bar as a pseudo-AOA gauge for better. smoother recoveries.

Overall, informative and useful training over the full four days, and oh so much better than the nightmare, abusive, "training" that Flowbacks had to endure at Eagle . . . not that I'm still recovering from that trauma or anything:-)

October 26, 2021

RLE scenario 15-6 DCA-BOS, IDG overheat no APU start.  Divert to JFK.  Just a couple things that were different from what I read on ABD or I don't remember seeing.  First, we taxied all the way to the gate at JFK after landing.  No big deal except that like an idiot I shut down the #2 engine and then realized the #1 engine had no generator and we had no APU.  So the airplane went dark.  No biggie, but embarrassing.   Turbulence - seems like they are going to give it to you no matter how hard you try to avoid it.  You have to make a PA to the pax as well as seating the FA's immediately. Everything else was pretty easy.

October 19, 2021

Much of the event has been covered on previous reports. The following is just what I noted by exception or things that surprised me despite reading all the previous reports.

A. The sequence of events for the RTS has changed recently. Previously the first event for the FO was the V2 cut. That has switched positions with the LOC approach to RWY 22R. I guess the event sequence doesn't even require the FO to takeoff for the first event, but our instructor gave me the choice of taking off if I wanted to.

B. The V2 cut does indeed come with gear retraction. I tended to delay my gear up call for a Mississippi or two. But, as delaying only forces you to pitch all the way to 15+ degrees only to pitch back down to 12.5 shortly thereafter, I'm not certain that getting the thrust loss over with and just stopping at or near 12.5 isn't the smarter call. Just food for thought.

C. The PRM breakouts are fairly straightforward as long as you only set, but don't select, altitude. One thing I was surprised to learn was that, when the PF breaks out and the PM sets the new altitude, the FD defaults to V/S. So, there's little need to reconstruct much in the way of automation, you’re in HDG/VS almost directly.

D. On the Single Engine ILS, there's a lot of wisdom to configuring on the 1.5 dot, 0.5 dot schedule vice the more conservative 3/2/1. As is often the case with the sim, we both elected to be conservative and dirty up early. But, all that does is require the AT to make power changes which sets you off to the races stepping on the Beta Target. If you do it as per the book, the trim stays about the same and there's much less clog dancing down the glideslope.

E. DFW-EGE. After you do the DFW takeoff to hot brake scenario, we ran the checklist and considered the event complete. Quite some time later when we were landing in EGE, we had a hot brake again. The point being that the hot brake at DFW might indeed be a locked brake and we should have considered landing back in DFW. Not sure if this is part of the script, but I think we both had thought that the hot brake spot was over. But it IS technically the same flight. Probably worth a discussion when you get the hot brake.

F. The DFW visual/fly through overspeed event can be a little confusing. It's gusty. You’re cleared
for the visual. Our AP was acting up which I don't think was part of the scenario. They want to see you go around if you are getting airspeed excursions such that you can't keep the speed out of the zipper.

Beyond that, the reports here covered everything in great detail and I saw nothing that deviated from the script. If you read this page and know your callouts, you should not be surprised by anything you see in training.

October 2, 2021

Day 1 - all classroom; review systems slides in advance; no pressure; everyone passes if they show up

Day 2 - RTS - if you show up with solid flows/triggers, having read the applicable OM pages relevant to each scenario, have a solid understanding of how to run the Non-normal (watch the video, then write out the PF and PM side of the phraseology) beginning with "My Aircraft" and the ability to smoothly regurgitate the "Go Around/Toga" sequence, all should go well. Review the RTS slides prior to the brief so you can answer the questions from the slides. Comments from pilots who recently completed the training accurately covered all aspects. The aggregation of the most recent several months of comments was particularly helpful.

Day 3 - MO - Same as the RTS comments above. It was a low stress event in both the brief and sim.

Day 4 - RLE/RAD - Same as above. We had DCA to BOS and actually got to Boston. Per the previous comments: put in the AAxx engine out on takeoff in the secondary flight plan (use the blue OD page to walk you through it LSK by LSK if you need assistance), be sure to note blue NAV before pushback and brief noting green NAV once airborne, then AP on at 200 AGL on departure. DOCTRx SID was smooth. Passing FL270 we got moderate turbulence and immediately descended. We could have asked sooner how rides ahead were. Smooth ride after descent. CA checked with dispatch regarding FL200 vs FL280 assigned (greater than 4k foot lower requires dispatch to recalculate fuel burn). We finally got a minor non-normal (AIR BLEED) after descending via in BOS for the ILS 33L on the ROBUC3 STAR; nothing tricky. We had both already verified the arrival and transferred controls accordingly. We chose to continue the descent and not declare PAN-PAN-PAN. We broke out at 500' or so and landed without further incident. After exiting the runway left on Q and holding short of runway 4L; RLE over.

RAD - review the maneuvers chapter and know the various responses to windshear, stall recovery, pitch and power settings (60% N1 at 10k feet, 70% at 20k feet and 80% at 30k feet) are good gouge number to know for the UNRELIABLE AIRSPEED (whick IS a QUICK ACTION item) which I missed because the DDI doesn't say that exactly. Then AP OFF, A/Thrust OFF, Level off, pull back power to 60% or so to avoid getting fast; declare Mayday-Mayday or Pan-Pan, ask for a vector to keep you safe and a block altitude to workout the issue. Once stabilized, either add power while staying level and observe which CA or FO or STBY airspeed reacts correctly; or keep power constant while climbing or descending to determine which airspeed indicator is reliable (read pages 16-3 - 16-5 for further explanation).

October 2, 2021

All previous narratives are correct, except that in RLE 15-2 & RLE 15-5 you'll get IDG 1 overheat instead. In both scenarios the APU will work. The rest is unchanged.
I believe there is another similar scenario where the APU will NOT work, but I can't verify which one it is.

September 7, 2021

At this time a good amount of information related to the new 12-month recurrent training cycle appears on this website. It is my aim to try to fill in perhaps some information that has not been touched on by the previous briefs. Therefore not all of the SPOTs are reviewed only the ones worth a word or two. Information that I observed or was mentioned by the instructor de-brief's.

My thoughts on the system review is that it the material covered is designed to support the following simulator sessions in an operational manner. Good intent on that objective. If the system review is taught by a former pilot all the better has he/she may be able to further lend application to the simulator sessions and real world knowledge.

Nothing to add really on the other ground school subjects at this time.

RTS 2021, all spots except spot 8 are conducted at JFK.

SPOT 1 Single-engine taxi, just remember after the first engine is started the CA calls for flaps_taxi. The after start call-out/flow is not made until after both engines are started.

SPOT 3 Pneumatic, Air conditioning, and Pressurization Non-Normal minor event I recall ours was a Vent Extract Fault. The CA will fly a VOR approach to 31L. This approach has an inbound course of 343 degrees while the runway is 314 degrees. The instructor will add a strong left cross wind so remember the applied drift angle so to avoid drifting right of the centerline. There are EO procedures for both 31L/31R.

SPOT 6 Electric Non-Normal was given as a #1IDG temp overheat but the APU was operative upon start. The IDG shut down event is again later in the RLE but the APU does not start.

MO 2021, SPOT 4 Hydraulic Failure was a HYD Y pump low pressure event.

RLE 2021 DCA to BOS diverted to JFK because the #1IDG over temp event occurred and the APU would not start. If a EO procedure applies to a runway as it does in KDCA runway 01, is to perform a route verification of the EO in the secondary flight plan as we normally do in the primary flight plan. Of course we covered all of the company pages about the security issues. Besides all of that, don't forget to do a quick brake test upon initial taxi as the instructor said people often miss that simple step? Taxi out to 01 no runway change, lights on when crossing 04/22. While the pace of the session is relaxed the instructor will compress time by giving direct to clearances and tailwinds. Yes we experienced moderate turbulence for a short period and got lower and used the proper terms with the FAs, ATC, and dispatch. After completing that task is when we were tasked with the IDG over temp.
The thing to remember here is that you will be near or over the top of JFK so time and task management is important. My FO did a great job with updating the FMC and preparing to fly to JFK. I completed the ECAM procedures and proceeded with communication requirements. To reach dispatch quickly I used VHF 2 on a frequency of 130.32 or 129.87 as found in FOM 7c-10 Communications. Spoke with the FAs and passengers and got back into the flying game with my FO. Landed at JFK taxied off the runway received an all clear verification RLE over.

First time thru the 12-month training cycle and have to say it seems well designed. Arrived prepared and managed to pay attention for most of the time - actually enjoyed it!

September 1, 2021 - Note: One of our super F/O's graciously summarized ALL the previous comments into the following summary ...

Day 1 All Classroom

Day 1: All classroom. 

-Review the systems slideshow and the highlights 

-Lots of performance questions regarding what is and is not acceptable in TPS data. 

-when in doubt, "get a new TPS" is always correct. 

 RTS Summary

1. Single-engine taxi

-Spot 1: SE Taxi. They are witnessing FO's on the line accomplishing after start flows too soon. 

-Spot 1) Single-engine taxi. We pushed off of gate 41, tail west, started engine 1, and proceeded with a low-visibility single-engine taxi via TA, right on A to 22R at F. I had the FO start 2 as soon as we were established on A and we arrived at the intersection departure right at the 3 minute warm up. 

-SPOT 1: Single Engine Taxi. Yes, this is actually a big enough deal to have its own SPOT. No tricks, they just want to see you go out on one engine (remember to turn on the Yellow Electric Pump, and to turn it off just prior to starting #2). Taxi route happens fairly quickly, so we started #2 once we got on A. During this drill, did all normal taxi checks, no surprises 

2. Low Visibility Takeoff, CAT II Autoland (CA) and Landing

spot 2) The big thing here is they want you to know who's outside and who's inside on a CAT3 and for the FO to know their calls.

Spot 2: low visibility T/O and CAT II approach. Main point already discussed is that you need visual reference for landing and that the NFP (FO) should not make any visual call outs (only CA), unlike all other approaches that are not autoland, (ie CAT II and III approaches). You must also ensure you have a takeoff alternate. All CAT II and III approaches need land app. Some considerations, CA can taxi in visibility as low as he/she is comfortable with but must be at that airport T/O minimums for departure. This can also be lower than landing minimums (ie: KMCO). Another good to know item is that you need to see CAT3 single or dual in order to conduct a CAT II approach (OD-18) shows you exactly what FMA will display for requirement. We can conduct approaches with CAT II displayed in FMA but it would be a CAT I approach due to our airlines requirement to autoland on all CAT II and CAT III approaches.

Spot 2) Captain Low-vis takeoff to a CAT II on 13L with landing. No tricks or gotchas. After takeoff and somewhere short of final vectors, the instructor put us on position freeze to allow time for the setup and briefing. Remember to discuss threats, go-around considerations and all the required briefing items for CAT approaches on the OD pages. It's a CAT II, so you have to see something, and you will barely see something. It's supposed to be an autoland. Apparently some pilots see the runway and disconnect the autopilot. Leave it connected until the 60 kt callout.

SPOT 2: Low Vis T/O, CAT II Autoland (CA) and Landing. Weather for T/O 1600 RVR. We shot the ILS CAT II Rwy 13L (21-3). Everything normal around the pattern. Remember on final, the FO stays inside on instruments, while the CA looks outside. On a Cat II, set the RA in the RA field (its 150'); this is a decision height, so you have to see something to actually land (and it has to be an Autoland). Of note, there are no visual callouts on CAT II/III approaches for the FO. Used the "three Bs" to do everything ("Boxes, blue pages, briefing"). Special emphasis this time on briefing what type of go around you would do. Approach and landing were uneventful, stopped straight ahead. 

3. Takeoff with Gusts, VOR Approach, Pneumatics, Air Conditioning, and Pressurization Non-Normal, Landing with Gusts, (CA)

SPOT 3: Next was CA from 22R again. Gusty X-Winds. We had Ventilation Extraction Fan fail with the associated ECAM. FO flew and CA did FIX. After selecting OVRD, ECAM cleared and there was no status remaining. EP over. Vectors to VOR 31L with strong winds from 220. The Final approach course was ~30 degrees from runway heading. FD guidance is only good down to minimums so brief turning off the FD and selecting FPA. Anticipate the turn to Final and try not to overshoot. No big deal to fly this, it's an exercise in transitioning from IMC to VMC and maneuvering.

Spot 3) Remember to brief the special engine failure procedure for this runway. 

SPOT 3: (CA) T/O with Gusts, VENT EXTRACT FAULT, VOR 31L Appr, Landing w/Gusts. The VENT EXTRACT FAULT is an ECAM procedures drill/FIX strategy drill. Remember to do an ECAM verification (used to call it a 'global check') - the CAB PRESS panel will be displayed on the lower ECAM with an amber outlet valve, plus the Fault light in the Extract switch. When you push the Extract button on the Ventilation panel (it will have a fault light in it), the ECAM goes away, and the exercise is essentially over. CA flew the VOR approach (don't sweat it, it's just like flying an RNAV except you toggle the VOR on and force feed the VOR frequency on the RAD/NAV page on the FMS). there is a displaced threshold. Our plan was to go, once we broke out, to "AP off, FDs off, give me the bird (FPV)". In reality, we did all that, however the FPV never really comes into your crosscheck and is unnecessary. Once you maneuver to roll out on final, just "forget" everything that happened to get you to that position (ref. it is sporty) and fly the rest of the approach visually (you will have PAPIs and the "Brick" to help with glidepath maintenance).

4. Takeoff, Engine Failure (Second Segment), Single Engine CAT I ILS Approach, Landing, (FO)

Spot 4/5: V2 cut for FO and unfortunately first time they fly the sim. Nothin new but just need to remember to pitch down to 12.5 degrees. We all know the drill with VI cuts but a good quick action if there is no time to accomplish non routine landing is 2 in/2 out (notify flight attendants and passengers/ dispatch and ATC)

SPOT 4: FO takeoff, first opportunity to fly. Engine Fail during second segment. Sim P told us it activates when the gear is raised. Standard stuff, no complications. CA needs to remember all briefings to FA's (2 Dings to brief #1, No TEST Briefing was needed) and passengers as appropriate. 

Spot 4) First Officer gets this takeoff, As soon as the gear came up, engine 2 failed with no remaining N1 or N2 rotation. After cleanup and assigning the pilot flying, I elected to treat the engine as damaged and we pressed the fire pushbutton and extinguisher per ECAM. this spot ends with the FO completing a hand-flown ILS to 31R to a landing. There is only one go-around on this RLE that is not self-induced. Remember to brief the engine-out missed approach procedure.

SPOT 4: (FO) Engine Failure (Second Segment), SE CAT I ILS 31R. Went pretty much by the book. Delayed TOGA thrust until after AP engagement. Also, declared "Mayday", and flew a box pattern. Hand flew SE final from a dog leg. 5 degrees rudder trim into the good engine is a good WAG.

5. Takeoff, Engine Failure/Fire (Between V1 and V2), Single Engine CAT I ILS Approach, Landing, (CA)

SPOT 5: Runway 22R CA takeoff, Engine Fail/Fire Between V1 and V2. Single Engine CAT I ILS, Land

Spot 5) Captain takeoff with engine 2 failure at V1, followed by the hand-flown ILS 31R. Nothing remarkable here

SPOT 5: (CA) Engine Failure with Fire (Between V1 and V2), SE CAT I ILS 31R Appr and Landing. Engine fire around V2. When it was time to designate PF, CKA asked us to keep the CA as PF, so the FO would have a chance to work an ECAM. There's a lot to think about, so here's just a few points: for initial pitch, set the box on the 10 degree line and let go of the pressure on the stick, because when go from ground to flight mode shortly after takeoff, it goes from demanding an elevator position to a rate, and then you can get into a vertical PIO. As well, if the engine that is on fire is still producing normal thrust, you should do a normal cleanup vs. the "level at 1000 feet" drill (somehow I've managed to miss this nuance all these years, but it's in the book, OM Vol I 2d.8.3 Engine Fire). In our situation, the engine conked out pretty quick. Hand flown SE pattern to a full stop.

6. Gusty Crosswind Takeoff, Electric Non-Normal, RNAV (RNP) AR 13R Approach, Gusty Crosswind Landing, (FO)

spot 6) A couple things on this RNAV. When you're doing the setup & brief, that want to see you checking the required equipment as well as the usual briefing stuff. Also, I rushed my review of OD-15 in regards to the speed limits in regards to RF legs inside the final approach fix. In a situation with an RF segment inside the FAF, the category speed restrictions apply the whole way from FAF inbound, not just the RF leg.
SPOT 6: FO Takeoff 22R Gusty X-Winds, Electrical Non-Normal (IDG #1 OVHT) The first indication something is wrong is the fact that the Electrical page illuminates on lower ECAM. If you look closely, you'll see its an advisory for IDG Temp. The Ding happened shortly afterwards and the ECAM came up. Once again, I gave the FO the plane and ran the ECAM which had me disconnect the #1 IDG. Don't forget <3seconds on the disconnect. Nothing more to do for ECAM procedures and the CKA was suggesting we might consider checking with dispatch to consider continuing to destination. If you start APU you're back to 2 generator operations but it's CA call whether to continue or not. At least have the discussion. RNAV (RNP) AR 13R was the approach. FO flew it. A few learning points. First off, be sure to look at company pages to verify legality and crosscheck SEL. There is a Specific Authorization required by the FAA to do this approach (It's in the CO pages). Verify Temperature is within range. Check Approach Category and ensure you would be legal for a CAT D. If so, don't exceed 165 before RWY threshold if you have to go Missed Approach, then there is a speed restriction to not exceed 210 till TIHWO so there are a few things to think about. Read all the notes! As a general rule check: Company Pages, SEL and ATIS before beginning set up for any Approach. 

SPOT 6: (CA & FO) Gusty Crosswind Takeoff, Elec Non-normal, RNAV (RNP) 13R Appr, Gusty Crosswind Landing. We got an "ELEC IDG 1 OVRHT" ECAM on climbout. This is a confirm item (red guarded switch). See RLE below (had same ECAM with the exception that the APU would not start). Started the APU and continued on (if you get two electrical supplies up, you can press on with your flight). Inside the final approach fix, told to go around prior to ZEBAK; speed is the name of the game, and since our mins were for both category C and D, our max speed was 165 knots on the go on the RF leg (CA briefed 155 knots for a buffer). Next speed is 210 max at TIHWO (in the MISSED APCH text on the plate). Came back around and landed uneventfully. Set up again outside of ASALT, and FO flew an uneventful approach to a full stop.
7. LOC Approach 22R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing, (FO)

Spot 7: Localizer approach. Nothing to add except NFP has PERF page up to monitor how high and low you are on path but green dot accomplishes that as well. 

Spot 7) First officer LOC 22R, go-around and landing. Nothing difficult here. Follow the OD pages and fly the approach and missed approach.

 SPOT 7: (FO) LOC Approach 22R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing. When selecting the approach in the FMS, make sure you select the LOC and not the ILS (they are both in there-the LOC is the only one that will give you step down fixes and possibly a lower minimum). Also, bottom of the approach is a DDA, so add 50' to the MDA ("Must Do Arithmetic"). Set a 1NM ring around MATTR using the Fix Info page (1L on the FPLAN page) and used the front edge to both make sure our level off hockey stick was outside of this ring, and to remind us to pull the FPA knob. Also used the far side of the 1NM ring as a reminder to set the missed approach altitude.


8. KORD ILS 10R PRM APPROACH AND BREAKOUT

spot 8) We performed the descending breakout without issue but got caught by the Airbus logic when trying to comply with further heading and alt. assignments after the initial maneuver. The CA elected to use the soft go around methodology to comply at this point, which works except that taking the thrust levers to TOGA activates the GA mode and switches to NAV even when you're trying to fly a heading. We caught it and pulled heading again, no harm no foul. When we di my breakout, I tried it just using selected speed and heading. It worked fine and the instructor said either way would work, the selected just seemed to have less potential for error in my opinion 
Spot 8: PRM Approaches, CA gets descending breakout, just remember "Breakout" and FO receives climbing maneuver "Breakout Toga". Just remember to comply with RA and then continue with missed approach 
Spot 8) Both pilots fly the LDA 28R PRM approach with a breakout.The breakout was a non-event turn off course at 1,500 feet. Maintain, altitude, stay in the Climb detent and reconfigure the aircraft when it's all done. We were not expected to brief the Attention All Users page associated with this approach. Just fly it, listen to the monitor frequency, and comply with the breakout instructions.

SPOT 8: (CA and FO) KSFO LDA PRM 28R PRM APPROACH AND BREAKOUT. The point of this drill is that by the end of the year, FOs will be able to fly PRMs (currently only CAs are certified to do them). Also, the emphasis is on descending breakouts. Make sure you review the text page that comes right before the plate in Jepp. CA went first, and somewhere after GOBEC, told to "breakout and turn right to 330, descend to 1200" (or something like that). It is an "autopilot off" maneuver, leave FDs on unless you get an RA, which we did not. The FO set and selected the heading, and as per procedure, set but did not select altitude (that would put you in an idle descent). Once you get to altitude, then select it. Don't use any automation until you have reached both your heading AND altitude. Accelerated to 210, pulled up the gear and went to flaps 2. Repositioned and the FO did the same drill, with the exception that the CA DID pull the altitude, which is our normal habit pattern, so lesson learned. SPOT over. 

 MO Summary

1. CA Low Visibility Takeoff, KMCO ILS CAT III 36R Approach, Landing

SPOT 1: Wx at MCO, RVR 5,5,5. CA takeoff, low vis, runway 36R Take off alternate is required. TPA was selected. Go to PROG page and enter TPA to verify distance to TPA is within limits (368 miles for a 320). 

SPOT 1: (CA) Low Vis Takeoff, KMCO CAT III 36R Approach, Landing. Given weather as "5/5/5", so had to determine if we needed a takeoff alternate (you do, but here's how you get there): 1) look on "back" of taxi chart (20-9A) to determine if you are even LEGAL to takeoff (you need minimum 5/5/5 to launch on all runways, so you are good), 2) Look at chart on page OD-8 in QRH to determine what reports and facilities are needed to takeoff (everything works, so good there), 3) same page tells you when you need an alternate-look at CAT III mins for RWY 36R (21-6) and see that you are below the 6/6/6 needed to land (plus you are below max landing wt), so BAM you need a takeoff alternate. We were told TPA was 1000/3 so that became our T/O alternate. Simple departure clearance (runway heading to 5000). We got a couple of turns to downwind, then were repositioned and frozen on a dogleg to final. Did all the appropriate briefs, checklists, etc, and shot an uneventful Autoland to a full stop straight ahead (chose full flaps for improved view). Only comment was "announce Autopilot-Off, THEN select autopilot off" so I felt like we must have done good if that was it.

2. FO Low Visibility RTO, Low Visibility Takeoff, KMCO RNAV (GPS) 36L Approach, Landing

Spot 2: RTO, pretty uneventful if call outs are made by FO and CA executes PA "This is the captain remain seated, remain seated, remain seated". 
SPOT 2: FO takeoff 36R, Engine fail second segment, SE pattern to a Go Around, alternate Missed Approach. Vectors to CAT I ILS 36R.

Spot 2) First officer low-vis (1600 RVR) rejected takeoff. Somewhere around 100 its we had a Thrust Reverser 1 unlocked. Stop the aircraft, parking brake, PA and what's the problem? No evacuation on this one and we repositioned for the same takeoff, followed by the MCO RNAV (GPS) 36L. A big emphasis item in this training is developing a thorough understanding of the approach naming conventions and how they fit into our SEL 8, 9 or 10 aircraft capabilities. An approach with AR or RNP in parentheses requires a 9 or 10 capable aircraft

SPOT 2: (FO) Low Vis RTO, Low Vis T/O, KMCO RNAV (GPS) 36L Approach, Landing. We blew a jug around 100 kts and rejected the takeoff. Remember, this is one of two times you are REQUIRED to make the "This is the captain-remain seated, remain seated, remain seated" PAs, the other being when you brief T.E.S.T. anticipating an evacuation, and one is NOT required (OD-37 bullet f). On the second attempt, we took off and did a box pattern back to the runway. The approach and landing were uneventful. 

3. FO Engine Failure Second Segment Climb, Single Engine Pattern, Go-Around\Missed Approach, KMCO CAT I ILS 36R, Landing

Spot 3) First officer takeoff with a second segment engine failure right after the gear is retracted. Just like yesterday, it will be a hand flown ILS, this time to MCO 36R with a single-engine go around. No engine out missed procedure published here, so it's just runway heading.

SPOT 3: (FO) Engine Failure 2nd Segment Climb, hand flown SE to a missed KMCO CAT I ILS 36R, Landing. Engine failure occurred after V2 with gear coming up. On SE approach, went around due to fog bank rolling in. Remember on the SE go, you are back in the 'trim the rudder' before AP will reengage (8-10 seconds rudder trim works pretty well, into the good engine). Discussed the new methodology of flying ground track on the go vs. runway heading (basically putting a heading correction into the wind in, using the FCU, so now when you hit green dot speed, you are effectively doing FOUR pulls-ALT, HDG, SPD, MCT. Runway heading was 005 degrees, winds were from the west, so we arbitrarily put in 355 degrees (ten degrees into the wind), and that seemed to work good enough. FO deselected the AP on a dog leg with flaps 2, so you get to do some configuring while in manual flight. Landing was uneventful. Just in case you haven't thought about it in a while, here are a couple of SE approach and landing tips (SIM ONLY): for course/glidepath control, keep the FD bars centered in the pitch box, forming a plus sign. When you need a correction, treat your side stick as a 'thruster', and just tap it towards the correction gently and wait (your primary focus is this box). When the runway comes into view, lookout briefly, announce "landing", then come back inside and stay on the box. When the RA announces "50" go back outside and land (if you look outside too early tendency is to level off and you are potentially going around). Don't try to make your corrections off of raw data in the sim, especially if you have good FDs. 

4. CA Takeoff with Gusts, Hydraulic Failure, KMCO LOC 36R Approach, Go-Around/Missed Approach, Landing

Spot 4) Captain gusty winds takeoff, hydraulic non-normal and MCO LOC 36R with a go-around. We bled out all the yellow hydraulic fluid after takeoff and got the ECAM for HYD Y RSVR LO LVL. Completed the procedures, set up and briefed the approach, but no runway in sight at minimums. Go around followed by the same approach with improved visibility and landing. No nosewheel steering, so it gets a little squirrelly as you slow down, but manageable. The check airman wanted me to see that you can actually clear the runway, even without nosewheel steering, so we did that using differential thrust and brakes.

 SPOT 4: (CA) T/O with Gusts, Hydraulic Failure, KMCO LOC 36R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing. Our HYD failure was HYD Y RSVR OVHT (I think but honestly can't remember). The big takeaway is how to do the Landing App procedure (in the past, have done this in the briefing, but this time actually accomplished it in the simulator). I don't have much else to contribute, so I will cover this in detail: Open the Landing App, and follow these steps: 1) reset the app (button is on second to bottom line), 1A) Select non-normal at the bottom of the page, 2) Select your aircraft (all CLT sims are 320s, and sim #4 is IAEs), 3) Select your failure (try to match your ECAM-for us, went under HYD, and selected Y SYS LO PR), 4) one reverser, 5) CG greater than 25%, 6) No wind correction as all SPOTS have an exact crosswind, 7) ***Use FMGC VREF (toggled on); go to PERF page for approach, and while FULL flaps selected, note the VLS (which in this world equals FMGC VREF), and enter it in the Land App directly below the "Use FMGC VREF" toggle. This will generate a VAPP in the lower left corner of the app; enter this number in ACARS in the lower left corner of the PERF APPR page, and THEN select Flaps-THREE for this emergency***, 8) note your landing distance, and compare this to the back of the taxi page (KMCO 20-9A) and look in the "USABLE LENGTHS-LANDING BEYOND" double column for your runway, in the left "Threshold" column, the only one that really means anything to us anymore (I believe this further leads you to a ball note for a usable length greater than 11K, obviously longer than the 5152 feet from the landing app). During the actual LOC approach, we made a 1NM radius around JAKOR; the front edge of the radius is to remind you to start down at .3NM, and the far edge of the radius is to remind you to set missed approach altitude. You can also use the radius to see how you are doing with your level off (where the hockey stick is depicted).

5. CA Engine Failure at V1, Single Engine KMCO CAT I ILS 36R Landing

SPOT 5: CA takeoff, V1 Engine Fail. Held the plane on the runway for a few extra potatoes while I confirmed which foot to press and when we got airborne was able to maintain HDG pretty easily while we did the procedures. Again, After initial response, FO flew and CA FIX'd. ILS 36R CAT I land.

6. KDFW-KEGE Departure, SID, Door Non-Normal

SPOT 6: Pre-positioned in DFW, Runway 17R. DFW-EGE was the plan. FO takeoff, Door Warning ECAM at 10,000 climbing out. Pretty much a non-event after ensuring the plane was pressurizing. Bad micro-switch in the Cargo Door. 
Spot 6) The big goal here is to run the ECAM, then the QRH follow-ups, then discuss with MTC/dispatch as necessary before you make a decision to carry on or return. Per the instructor there has been an increasing number of crews making unnecessary returns for similar events that actually didn't require a return.

7. KDFW 18L Takeoff, Departure, Brakes Non-Normal

spot 7) The overheat happens SLOW. This may be a programming issue with the spot, but after several minutes in the air and nearing the FLs, the instructor finally just said "ding" to have us go through the motions because the brakes hadn't even gotten to 250 yet. The big takeaway here is to be aware of BOTH speed restrictions on moving the gear. The ECAM will tell you both while it's displayed but it goes away once the overheat condition no longer exists. So just remember 250 going down, 220 going up and plan/maneuver accordingly and you're fine.

Spot 7: Also discussed in detail. Considerations are speed, 210kts to bring gear up because of our policy of -10 and not accelerating. Also communicate with center regarding gear and speed as well as flight attendants and possibly passengers.

Spot 7) FO crosswind takeoff fro DFW 18L with a brakes non-normal. We got the expected BRAKES HOT ECAM, notified ATC that we couldn't comply with the speeds on the departure, assured that we were below 250 kts and extended the gear, slowed to below 220 kts as they cooled, then verified we were still below 220 kts to retract. This was followed by a captain flown RNAV (RNP) Z 13R in visual conditions with a tower-directed go-around. Pay attention to the fine print on the missed approach, there's a 185 kt speed restriction to keep you clear of converging traffic on the 18 approaches. The MCDU had the 185 kt built in, but the FMGC didn't honor it, so intervene and set a selected speed below 185.

8. KDFW 18L Visual Approach, Gusty Winds

spot 8) This spot seems designed to check you're reaction to an impending overspeed on final and unlike the brake hot scenario, it happens FAST. By that I mean if you don't see it as soon as the speed starts trending up, it happens so quickly that you may not prevent the overspeed. The good news is that the desired takeaway is that they mainly want to see you taking some sort of corrective action when you notice it such as using gear, speed brakes, push to level off, etc.

Spot 8) DFW 18L visual approach. Doesn't matter who flies, I think it was the FO on this one. It's kind of a contrived scenario to overspeed the flaps. Everything was smooth and normal until all of a sudden, the airspeed rapidly increased into the red. It was pretty lame, but the takeaway is that they want us to be uber aware of airspeed and err on the cautious side with flap extension speeds.
SPOT8 : (Either) KDFW 18L Visual Approach, Gusty Winds. We did a visual approach. It was to 18L. Plenty of info on this in the slide shows, basically use all instrument tools available (ILS, RNAV, etc) to back up your visual approach, and stay above the TCA floor. Emphasized using the 3 to 1 rule to avoid busting the bottom of the TCA. 

9. KEGE LDA 25 Visual Approach to Uncontrolled Field, Go Around, Visual Pattern and Landing

Spot 9 - Spot is mostly for uncontrolled radio work. We elected not to "Go Around", no need to re-string approach and had briefed the 10-7B-5 Visual Pattern RWY 25. We just leveled off at 8500', retracted flaps to 3 and stayed at 155kts. Instructor advised to just leave gear and drive around to stay in close for terrain. Think I'd rather retract gear and still drive around on flaps 3. Then gear/dn, flaps full at EG25D and a 7-800'/m descent worked fine. Be sure to cancel flight plan - ask controller if freq avail on gnd, or call Dispatch on gnd.
spot 9) On the downwind to final turn don't necessarily set the heading to the full 180degree turn like you probably would do for the upwind to downwind turn to start the visual pattern. Being fully configured by the EGE25D point lets the plane turn tight enough that it will actually point you at terrain on the W side of town. My suggestion, set you're heading for about a 45degree base to final and adjust from there. 

Spot 9: more of a training demo regarding set up for approach and missed so no need to overstudy. Main takeaway is runway lighting that you have to activate and masking correct calls at uncontrolled field ie "Eagle traffic, American XX 2 mile final Eagle"

SPOT9 : Eagle, CO. We did an Eagle check out. Discussed the LDA 25 procedures in depth. CKA discussed all the pitfalls and hazards IAW CO pages and warnings on the plates. He had us set up for the visual approach by creating a point on left downwind to turn left to if we should have to go missed approach. The preference is to fly a left hand Vis pattern versus the entire Missed Approach procedure since weather is usually good before even going there. He also had us create a pseudo final approach course in the secondary FP by selecting the Runway 25 as a fly-to point and extending a line out to infinity so that we could have at least a back up to a glide slope. There is a whole page devoted to Visual Pattern RWY 255 on 10-7B-5. Then he pre-positioned us outside of AQULA and we flew the LDA and we commenced the approach 5 mile final he told us to expect a go-around since there was a plane on the runway. We leveled off at 8500 and turned lefty to the point we created and then flew a left base. FO will have to make all Advisory calls since tower is unmanned. Go over appropriate verbiage from your light aircraft days. CKA had us set the SE Missed Approach in the Secondary Flight Plan because we might lose an engine on a go-around. Once on final, we got a report from a 172 that there were chipmunks on the runway and I executed a go-around. As soon as I reset the Thrust to Climb, Boom #1 engine fails, now we're no-kidding doing the SE Missed which is a circuitous procedure. I took a few extra seconds to put the Thrust Levers back to TOGA and it was a great exercise in how critical that is. We got a GPWS during the escape but we had no choice but to continue. There is a note about not changing configuration and don't level off, accelerate or retract flaps till APRES on the MAP. Lesson for myself: TOGA, TOGA, TOGA in mountainous terrain. It was a good familiarization for me not having been there before. FOM says I still have to fly with a check airman but at least I've seen what's entailed.

Spot 9) EGE LDA 25 visual approach. Anybody can fly it or both can try it. It results in a go-around for traffic. There's a special VFR pattern that you have to build some points for in the Fix Info pages, then you just manually fly the circuit and set up a 700-800 fpm descent to landing after you pass the EG25D point. You'll cross a ridge and fly down a valley that basically forms a 45º dogleg to final. I found the Track/FPA presentation helpful. As others have pointed out, you'll be operating there with no control tower, so the PM is expected to make standard CTAF calls.
SPOT 9: (Either) KEGE LDA 25 Visual Approach to Uncontrolled Field, Go Around, Visual Pattern and Landing. This is basically a terrain awareness exercise, as well as how to make radio calls on CTAF at an uncontrolled airfield. We did not get too deep into the details of getting in and out of Eagle. One point is that you are instructed to, in the event of a missed approach, fly the EO MA (10-7E-4), even if you have two good engines (the reasoning is that if you are on the normal MA ground track and lose an engine, you may not be able to maintain terrain clearance). We started around VOAXA, partially configured, and there was a Cessna on the ground making calls that he was preparing for takeoff. As we got closer to the field, fully configured, it was obvious the Cessna was not going to initiate their takeoff roll, so initiated a soft go around. Following Visual Pattern guidance (10-7B-5) we leveled off at 8500 approaching CIPKU, and made a left-hand pattern, aiming at EG25D (set on the Fix Info page), which is basically the "perch" point (for configuration, raised flaps to 2 and raised the gear during the go), reconfigured approaching the perch, then flew a 'final turn' and landed uneventfully on Rwy 25. One issue we had was with speed; because we did a go around, we would have to activate and confirm again to get managed speed (among other things); did not figure this out at first so decided to just fly a selected speed that made sense. Halfway thru the final turn, the CKA told the PM to give the PF managed speed (activate and confirm). A 'sim'-ism was that at 8500' on downwind, you only cleared the terrain by 400' at one point (CKA thought it was a terrain modeling issue in the sim). MO over.

RAD Summary

1. Unreliable Airspeed

Spot 1: unreliable airspeed, same as last year. Checkairman took us though all 3 types (BKUP SPD, BUSS EQUIP, and neither BKUP SPD/ALT aircraft)...this was a demo as he explained how detail oriented it would be with basic aircraft as NFP would be continuously looking over charts for power settings through different phases of flight. It was a great demonstration and nothing you have to really prepare for.

SPOT 1: CA Unreliable Airspeed. Flew the Cowboy 8 out of KLAS. Flew manually on the SID. After ROPER, was told to reengage the automation, and going thru around 9K, the FO noticed his airspeed increasing dramatically. "My Aircraft", then leveled off at 10K. Run as a non-normal. The actual ECAM you get is something like NAV ADR Disagree, so not obvious at first that you may have an unreliable airspeed problem. Make sure you coordinate with departure (declare MAYDAY and ask for a safe altitude for terrain clearance and a vector (basically got 10K and a downwind heading). This is a quick action, so FO goes to #6 on the QRC, and works the procedure. AP off, A/THR off, FD off, then (technique) turned the FPV on (this was great for holding level flight and still worked). Used the following gouge for a "first guess" at thrust setting: 60% at 10K, 70% at 20K, 80% at 30K. Sim 4 has the BUSS, so we played around with that for a while (gouge with that is that during your approach configuration, as the speed gets to the low end of the green band (and into the yellow), it's time to make the next configuration). When you go to the new QRH (pg. 16-3), and start busting thru the charts, make sure you read the table headers and choose the correct one for your aircraft type, engine type, configuration. We set the initial pitch and thrust and looked at our three AS indicators-the standby was the closest to what the chart said we should be doing, so we decided ADR 3 was still working properly. NOTE: ADRS are laid out on the panel in the order "1-3-2", so ensure you are shutting off the correct ones!
Spot 1) Captain takeoff with unreliable airspeed at around 8,000 feet. First officer showed me at around 280 knots and my PFD and the STBY showed 250. Followed the procedure for setting pitch at 10º and climb thrust since we were above acceleration altitude and below 10,000 ft. Terrain wasn't immediately and issue, so I leveled at 8,500. Our sim had the BUSS pushbuttons, so it was a pretty quick process to get the airplane stabilized.

2. Windshear/Microburst on Takeoff and Approach KLAS - FO on Takeoff prior to VR 26R, CA on Approach 26L

Spot 2) First officer takeoff with predictive windshear. We talked about the considerations on the runway, turned on ignition, elected to use TOGA and began the takeoff roll. At about the point that the predictive windshear advisory displayed on the ND, I went brain dead and rejected the takeoff. Reminder, that for advisories, we continue the takeoff and turn away from the windshear depiction. The check airman was gracious and didn't fault me for my overly conservative rejected takeoff, and it was a good chance to discuss the requirement to return to the gate for a maintenance write-up for any rejected takeoff over 80 kts. We did the takeoff again and as soon as we were airborne, turned south to avoid the weather. After repositioning, it was my turn for a reactive windshear escape on approach. I left the autopilot on until 200 feet on the approach, and as soon as I disconnected it, we were in the shear. Follow the escape procedure and have fun!

SPOT 2: Windshear on T/O and Approach KLAS-FO on Takeoff prior to V1 26R, CA on Approach 26L. ONLY time you are ever required to perform the windshear escape maneuver is when you get "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" reactive guidance inflight; if you hear that, "Escape, TOGA, My Aircraft". Also, if you get a Caution or Warning from the predictive windshear system during takeoff and below V1, REJECT (if it is talking to you during the takeoff, REJECT-don't reject for an Advisory which doesn't "talk"-check thrust to TOGA and continue the takeoff). The predictive system goes "silent" at 100 kts, so if its talking you are most likely below V1. In our scenario, the FO was performing the takeoff, and around 80 kts got "Windshear Ahead"; the CA performed a reject (new weather graphics were pretty cool in sim 4). Another note on takeoff: if you are going to continue, guidance says rotate NLT 2000' remaining-a good visual cue for 2000' remaining is that the edge lights turn amber. Yet another note: told that besides ensuring you are slowing down, the '80' and '60' calls are there to help insure the CA stows the reversers during a reject (because it may lead to an evacuation and you don't want them out with peeps going outside). On approach, if it says "Go Around-Windshear Ahead" perform a normal GA and steer away from the depicted windshear, and if gets into the "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" then do the escape maneuver. The CA shot the ILS to 26L, and at around 400' got "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" and executed the escape maneuver. Very eye opening, as the A/C bounced around a lot, and it took full aft stick to keep it from hitting the ground (got down to 40' RA). On a side note, we set up for windshear and several other EPs that did not "insert' themselves (i.e., no windshear ever materialized on first try); we were told this is b/c they're just loading more stuff into the sim computers than they were ever designed to handle.

3. KLAS 26R Takeoff/ SID/ Upset Recovery (FO), Manually Controlled Slow Flight/Recovery from Full Stall (Both)

Spot 3: Slow flight demo and full stalls. This is much like the first event we had with full stalls and treated as a learning event. It was a great recap on how aggressive you need to be on full stalls.

Spot 3) First officer hand-flown SID with autothrust off. Non event, followed by a surprise upset recovery once the autopilot had been re-engaged. 

SPOT 3: KLAS 26R Takeoff/SID/Upset Recovery (FO), Slow Flight, Full Stall. FO performed a hand flown Cowboy 8 departure. Passing ROPER, the FO selected full automation. During the climbout we were warned of a heavy that was four miles in front of us. The FO was given a DIR TO, and while heads down, went into an upset. Recovery was uneventful (remember to be smooth as there are peeps in the back). We were repositioned to 38K, and the CA went first (dealers choice) for hand-flown slow flight. Did a thrust demo, moving the levers from CLIMB to MCT then TOGA, and noticing that EPR and N1 did not move much at all, as well as you just didn't feel anything happening. Took turns flying around, where the PM would dial in a new heading for the PF-just did a couple of turns. Next, FO went first for the full stall; CKA put us in alternate law, and after pulling the thrust levers back to idle, instructed us to hold 38K until we got the "STALL STALL" aural warning. The most important thing for breaking the stall is to reduce the AOA, so push the stick forward (takes a lot), while simultaneously bring the thrust levers up to about halfway to CLIMB. As A/S increases above VLS, start to smoothly add back pressure (don't pull it into a secondary stall as pitch and roll are highly sensitive at high altitude), and smoothly add power back in. Continue your climb back up to 38K (lost about 4K during the recovery). Also, remember to not "cobb" the power up (i.e., don't slam it to CLIMB), at the beginning of the recovery, as this will be too much thrust, pitch the nose up and keep you from breaking the stall effectively.

4. Upset Recovery (Maneuver Based)

SPOT 4: Upset Recovery. We were repositioned over Lake Mead, clean, at about 5K. FO went first. While on freeze, given 40 degrees nose high, 287 kts, and told to recover. FO rolled smoothly to 30 degrees of bank and pushed over to the horizon. Rinse and repeat for the CA. Remember, there are peeps in the back, so be as smooth as you can without sacrificing the recovery (watch your A/S during the pushover and don't let it get below VLS).
Spot4) We went up to FL380 and both had a chance to do some slow flight, with an emphasis on how little engine thrust is available up there if you get behind the curve. This was followed by the high altitude stall for each of us. Then a couple of upset recovery maneuvers.

5. Manually Controlled Instrument Arrival and Upset Recovery

Spot 5) Captain hand-flown STAR with no autothrust. 

SPOT 5: Manually Controlled Instrument Arrival and Upset Recovery. CA flew this one. Used the TYSSN 5 ARRIVAL, and started just inside CEJAY at 19K. Hand flown to about TYSSN, then told to recouple the automation. Given DIR PRINO (a fix on the ILS 26L) and while heads down put in an upset recovery. Recovered to wings level, and SPOT over.

6. High Altitude, High Energy Go Around 

Spot 6: High altitude, high energy go around. You do not need to do a soft go around, mostly a demonstration to level off or slow climb and cleanup.

Spot 6) Captain flown visual approach to 26L with a capture of the glideslope from above. Just be ready to arm the approach, dial the altitude up and set v/s between -1,500 and -1,800 as soon as the sim comes off freeze. We did the go-around off of this, 

SPOT 6: High Altitude, High Energy Go Around. CA's approach to 26L. (This is also a "capture the GS from above" exercise) Just inside LARRE at 6500' and high on GS, cleared for the approach. Was flaps 2, 170 kts SELECTED A/S. Selected V/S to 1800' (target range is 1500-1800), ensured APPR is armed (most important thing), and spun altitude up to 8K (to prevent capturing alt on way down). After GS captured, continued with normal approach and set missed approach altitude. At 5200', told that approach clearance had been cancelled, and given a turnout heading of "Right to 100 degrees at RELIN, climb and maintain 7000". This is where the fun began: CA initially called for 7K and gear up. we had pre-selected the heading, and when we pulled it the plane turned LEFT instead of RIGHT (turns in the shortest direction). Also, we SET 7K on the FCU, but did not SELECT (pull) it! Actually trapped both errors pretty quickly (ok plane continued descent to 4200 but who's counting), turned the AP off and manually turned plane back to the right, FO selected the ALT on the FCU and exercise over (the heading thing was one of the big objectives of this SPOT, and a better answer would be to, instead of pre-setting the heading to 100 degrees, wait until arriving at RELIN to start spinning the heading to the right). Entire Sim took around three hours.

LOE Summary

                                         DCA - BOS

We had DCA-BOS, no runway change, temp 15. Checkairman tries to keep you busy. We got a report of moderate turbulence above our cruising altitude. We requested a lower altitude and was granted our request but you get unexpected moderate turbulence anyway. Make sure to notify dispatch for new fuel burn under 4K. I had briefed flight attendants on ground regarding turbulence and called the flight attendants in flight to notify them of light turbulence procedures and time based on report of "some turbulence below FL 260 and moderate reported at FL 270" we were FL200 per request. Encountered moderate turbulence anyway and made a PA "flight attendants, be seated immediately" we discussed in debrief and checkairman seemed very satisfied with turbulence handling. The takeaway I got was that you are going to get an unexpected turbulence event so just follow procedures. We then got an IDG disconnect which is a confirm item and APU auto shut down on start so we had to divert (went to JFK). It doesn't matter who flies but the FO and I discussed having FO fly, just easier because our procedures prefer the FOs to fly during non normal events for the most part anyway but it is CA discretion. Pretty straight forward, just continuously busy throughout event.

For our RLE sim ride we had # 15-6 DCA to BOS with a IDG overheat/APU won't start @ altitude/divert into JFK (ILS 13L). Land 13L @ JFK and taxi off the runwaymake a few turns with ground control and stop on the taxiway. Ride over. 

No problems getting off the gate @ DCA. Just conduct the mandatory briefings for the all the EO and airspace found in the company pages on your IPad. 
Load EO SID (10-7 pages) into the secondary flight plan to include one mile ring around PLIVA on the fix page.  NAV in blue (call that out) before you take-off Runway 1. 200 feet on departure NAV in green (call that out) and engage autopilot @ 100 feet AFL. The sim is rough when you hit the turbulence. Slow down and ask for lower and it magically smooths out

Day 4: LOE was DCA-BOS #6. Everything is DCA-BOS right now until they change the heading on the evaluation form. There is no BOS-DCA header, so apparently they are not allowed to fly that scenario yet…? I guess pen and ink changes are not allowed on the evaluation form. Anyway the LOE itself was takeoff out of DCA RWY1, brief all the stuff out of DCA, taxi out, takeoff, SID all uneventful. Expect moderate turbulence and the Capt does his notifications to the FAs. After it smooths out we had the IDG temp advisory, overheat ECAM. The APU failed to start, we were down to 1 generator and diverted to JFK ILS 13L. It gets busy because you are close to JFK at FL270 or somewhere in the 20"s, and the Capt has to do all the Capt stuff. Take your time descending, don"t hurry, ask for a vector (not approved), so I asked for holding. Held at BUZON while we finished up with all the checks and notifications. This also allowed to slow things down, get down to a good altitude for the approach. BUZON is only about 12 miles from JFK. Uneventful approach and landing, taxi clear, flaps up, get on taxiway A, then its over! Dont relax on the runway, play it out another minute!!!

We had scenario 15-4, DCA-BOS. There's a couple of issues with the flight docs that are included in the training manual. We were supposed to have a CDL for a missing static wick, but the flight plan had the MEL for the APU generator instead. The check airman said to ignore that and go with the CDL depicted in the briefing slides. Not a big deal for the non-normal that we got later in the flight. The weather on flight documents was different that the ATIS printouts we got in the sim. It was 3/4 mile vis, so I elected to do a two-engine taxi so the FO and I could both have our attention outside where it belongs. Straightforward taxi to RWY 1 via J and hold short of 4. All lights on for the crossing. Remember to thoroughly brief the P56 avoidance area, as well as engine out considerations. Check NAV in blue before pushback and again before taking the runway, then verify NAV green by 200 on departure. I find it helpful to write a note on the departure chart to remind me, just incase some distraction pops up on the taxi out. Departure was uneventful. Climbing out of 180 we were advised that there was moderate turbulence from FL220-360. We asked for FL200 and it was approved. I called the FA's anyway, and of course we still encountered the moderate turbulence right after that. Know your standard turbulence procedures. It didn't last long, and we were out of it and got the seatbelt sign off. I sent a message to dispatch to let them know that our altitude was more than 4,000 from planned and to give a turbulence PIREP. The sim doesn't have the capability of uplinking new fuel burn numbers, but the check airman faked it for us anyway. They do a good job of keeping things busy with frequency changes and direct clearances. We got the approach briefed and were nearing TOD when we got the ECAM for AIR ENG 1 BLEED LEAK. Not much to do here, except to avoid icing conditions. I asked ATC about reports and they had none. Then I used the Dispatch Direct VHF network frequency for the New York-Boston area and checked with dispatch. They also had no icing reports and concurred that continuing to BOS was the best plan. I checked the ECAM supplemental and noted that our ENG 1 bleed valve was properly closed and the temperature had fallen below the trigger point, so I was not concerned about temps inside the nacelle and we proceeded to BOS. The weather had deteriorated and the expected Light Visual (RNV-F) to 33L had been replaced by the ILS 33L. After landing, we taxied clear of the runway and took a break before beginning the RAD portion.

RLE - We had (and advised day before) 15-5 (DCA-BOS). Pulled up paperwork the night before. MEL was APU Gen Inop, but was advised to disregard that (Instructor got an email to change scenario). ATC advised us about mod turb from FL220-330 - we were filed for 270, so after checking fuel (plenty) requested final of FL 210. About 170K' in the climb, received mod CAT for short duration - called back to check on F/A's and all was fine so continued (smooth). Also had ELEC IDG 1 Oil OVHT, but APU OK, so notified Mx thru ACARS and continued to BOS. Descent on ROBUC arrival and eventually cleared direct to LYHTT for Light Visual (RNV F) 33L. Be sure to set in 269' (250 + field elev) in Baro and be at 1800' and configured by LYHTT for a tight turn. Received ATC instructions to G/A (traffic on rwy I think), so Soft Go to vectors for a Visual 33L - had F/O dial in and brief ILS as a backup. 
RADs - all training, so all very good. 

For our RLE, we did 15-6, which was DCA to BOS. Our non-normal was ELEC IDG 1 OIL OVHT, APU no start, divert into JFK because one generator=AMBER LAND ASAP (land at nearest suitable field).

                                                          BOS - DCA

Scenario 15-1 is Gate B-16 in Boston, operating shuttle flight to DCA. (some sims are programmed to be at B-10, but ours (Sim #2) was B-16. SOP's for departure from the gate. It's 10 degrees Celsius outside and a half mile visibility, so engine anti ice ON for operations. Taxi to 15L for departure, the 22's are closed for inspection. Somewhere along the way (ahem, after you run the Before Takeoff Checklist), you get notified that new ATIS information D current, and you will now be departing off of 22L. You have the data in the TPS, no gotchas. Revalidate the flight plan, reconfirm the numbers, rerun the checklist. Took off, anti ice off and then back on climbing through temperature inversions, no biggy. Cruise altitude is 30,000 feet. On climb, ATC amended our altitude to 26,000 feet and assigned that as our final altitude. I sent a message to dispatch giving our new cruise altitude and fuel on board for updated "enroute flight progress data". I asked how rides were ahead, was told intermittent chop with occasional moderate turbulence between 22,000 and 38,000. I immediately notified #1 flight attendant and advised them of flight time remaining and to begin using "MODERATE TURBULENCE PROCEDURES" for the remaining 44 minutes of flight, followed by a PA to the passengers. Got a few jolts, but was told that we did everything we were supposed to do, so wasn't anything worse than occasional light chop the rest of the way to DCA. Normal arrival planning and crossing restrictions for the CLIPR and for the ILS 01. After everything was briefed for the arrival and approach, we begin our descent and received an Amber CAS message- AIR ENG 1 BLEED LEAK. FIX strategy. Followed up with QRH. Followed up with Supplemental Manual. Discussed together. At this point we were 44 miles from DCA, elected to call maintenance for the early alert heads up, gave them ETA and gate, pretended to write it up in the book. Wrapped up by 11,000-ish feet. Weather in DC was overcast and 12 degrees Celsius. Asked ATC if any reported icing conditions on descent (message says to "avoid icing conditions") - none were reported and the temperatures remained good the whole way in. Vectors to ILS 01. Land. Exiting the runway, we were originally assigned gate 26, check airman says that's a typo, to park at 25, no different than a normal gate change. Pull in, park, checklist - Done. 

CLT Sim #1
Scenario 15-3 BOS- DCA divert to PHL

Fight plan and TPS very straight forward. Normal start off Gate B-16, verbage for push crew needs to be verbatim. Taxi out to RWY 15R via E1 K B L. Normal procedures until RWY change to 22L. Elected to stop and reload the box and rerun Before Takeoff Checklist. Multiple runway crossings so make sure you adhere to FOM. Don't go below the line until you have crossed 22R and watch your Min T/O fuel. We had a sim issue which caused us to sit idling for 15 minutes. Normal A-I on Takeoff to a HDG and RV to the first fix. Accomplish all normals until level off. After level off and Seatbelt sign off; begin getting Moderate Chop; turn on seatbelt sign and tell flight attendants "Moderate Turbulence Procedures until we can change alt and find smother air" Make a PA to the pax and then try to change altitude. Dropped down 2k' smoothed out. ELAC 1 and 2 fault which was a Sim fault (not planned). We ran the ECAM per SOP and both reset. Shortly thereafter IDG #1 overheat with APU auto-shutdown. Make sure you run the APU shutdown ECAM and follow-ups. Declare Pan Pan Pan with ATC and coordinate with dispatch for a divert to PHL for wx and Notams, (used crew phone) Used OD pages as follow ups for the diversion. Talk to the FAs, Talk to the Pax etc ... ILS 9L to stop on the rwy and subsequently taxi to the gate. We had other issues with the Sim which made it more difficult but handle it as you would in the real world.

RLE (LOFT)/RAD BOS-DCA 
The briefing was very professional! My CKA was being evaluated by the FAA for recertification...greeeeaaat! I arrived about 30 minutes early to get my head in the game. The CKA came about 5 minutes later and couldn't have been more disarming. He explained that he was being "observed" and that it should be no big deal (right!) He put me totally at ease and we chatted a few minutes until the FAA guy arrived and we all talked about flying stuff. It was nice but it occurred to me this is still an eval and the CKA wasn't cutting any corners. Sure enough, when the brief commenced, Slide #1, the CKA looked right at me and asked me to explain what the TEM model was about. I gave a few boiler plate answers about barriers, tools and safety making sure to leave room for the FO to chime in and he did. It was a softball question but I knew he needed to show the FAA guy he was engaging us. We got questions all the way through this briefing which lasted 1+40. We had a few questions about TPS, Weight and balance, RNAV approach naming conventions, plus a few other softballs throughout and eventually we had a couple walk-around questions. Bottom line: If you read the slides and pay attention to where there might be questions, you'll be fine. The FAA guy complimented the CKA and us for being prepared. CKA gave us each a printed version of all documents we'd need for the eval including a CDL for static wicks. Be sure you make it clear you at least addressed this by checking MEL/CDL. All ground ops were totally normal. We briefed all CO pages including checking the FMA for Nav Blue before taxiing and NAV green at or before 200'. Plugged in PLVIA with a 1 DME ring and alternate/engine procedure in the Secondary (standard stuff) Completed ground ops. CKA told us to shoot for 1150 for off the gate and of course I didn't remember to start the PU until CKA dinged us like the MX guys always do to ask for permission to remove external power…Doh! No big deal. We finished all checklists and were off of Gate 25 at DCA, weather at DCA was IFR, NE winds no icing conditions.
We taxied to runway 01 via J, crossed Runway 4. Put lights on when crossing runway (Note: Be sure you're both outside while on the crossing runway, my FO was debriefed about looking inside while on the runway…very minor point but I feel like the CKA had to be sure to show the FAA guy he was looking at everything). FO Takeoff was totally normal. I suggested he consider using AP as soon after takeoff that he was comfortable. He did and departure was totally vanilla. Received a few vectors then after level off at 270, we got a radio call from DC Center about company reporting moderate turbulence 30 miles ahead. I asked for a lower altitude, not right now…We talked about the airspeed for turbulence penetration and sure enough, we entered what felt like light to occasion al moderate, nothing worse. Be sure to not only tell FA's but make a PA to pax about "Turbulence" ahead, not bumps or rough ride or any other slang term. I briefed the #1 but didn't make a PA because it was smooth when we got the call. The CKA just wanted us to show we knew about the newer procedures in FOM. I was expecting something to happen and frankly, the silence was unsettling but it wasn't until we passed JFK (first fix on ROBUC3) into Boston. Ok, we're just about committed to continue to destination now. Then, 'Ding' ECAM: AIR L WING BLEED LEAK The Blue section said only, Avoid Icing Conditions. FO was flying, He said "My aircraft" and I proceeded through the FIX. Honestly, the fact that it so abbreviated threw us both off. FO got on the radio and asked if Boston was reporting any icing conditions and the answer was no so we agreed to press on. The thing that made me uncomfortable was the fact that the PACK 1 button was illuminated with FAIL but there was no instruction to turn off the pack. FO suggested we start the APU as a backup for Bleed if we needed it so we waited till we were below FL200 and started the APU. I checked the ECAM Supplemental for something to do but that was our Non-Normal. We got vectors off the STAR and flew a non-event ILS to 33L cleared at R and as soon as I called for flaps up, CKA said we were done.

 RLE-15-1 BOS-DCA
It was a thru flight. No need to test first flight of the day stuff. Run it like a real flight. They want you to do PA, FA brief, talk to all the normal people. Make sure to use only standard phraseology on push back. No gotcha's during the preflight or taxi out.
ATIS was using 15L. Weather was 10/10 and BR so we turned on eng ice after start. 2 eng taxi. Once around the corner and after we did the before takeoff, they switched runway to 22L and also departure to the Patts5 from the Logan departure. We stopped on the taxiway short of 15L at November and did all the updates to the FMS, speeds, and re-checked the flt plan page for the new departure routing. Re-run the before takeoff checklist to the line. Once complete, we told ground ready to taxi and they gave us instructions for 22L with numerous Rwy crossings and hold shorts. Use lights crossing all rwy's.
Normal takeoff and flew departure and on climb out, moderate turbulence reported between 22-25 our cruise altitude was 30. Call flight attendants and let them know to remain seated and use the term moderate turb procedures in effect. You will call them back when it's safe to get up. Also, make a PA to the pax to let them know you have instructed the flight attendants to remain seated. ATC then told us 260 would be final to DCA. Don't forget to load 260 in the prog page for new cruise altitude. Halfway to DCA we got "Air Eng 1 Bleed Leak". Don't forget "My Aircraft" and then PM runs the quick action or ecam exception......Assign pilot flying and then run the ecam and follow ups. Not much to do here, but wing anti ice inop. Use available resources, PF should call ATC and find out about icing into DCA, PM (CA) should call dispatch and advise and ask for any icing pireps or any knowledge from the dispatcher about possible icing on decent and approach to DCA. We didn't have any reports of icing so we elected to continue to DCA and did the ILS 01, cleared runway and that was the end. They are really emphasizing to use all available resources. 

 General Notes

1. Lots of TPS scenarios so I'd recommend both FO and CAPT have a good understanding of the TPS. Everything is a training event other than the LOE. 

2. They are emphasizing standard verbiage, flying without automation or disconnecting it when needed - then re-establishing it when appropriate. They are also emphasizing the "Gotcha's" with TPS data. As always, review Go-Around procedures, single engine procedures, runway assessments, and OD pages. 

3. F/A briefing - FM

4. Know your flows and callouts

5. Load alternate fuel on INIT B page, routing + approach
Review Company pages

6. Review MELs

7. Brief taxi route, hotspots, and TPS performance

8. Route + Arrival verification / check re-routes

9. All lights on when crossing runways, “Clear left, clear right”

10. TCAS: “Autopilot Off, Flight Directors OFF”

11. Monitor 121.5 

12. RSVM Altitude cross check at level off

13. When diverting, talk to ATC, OCC (use Air Cell phone), F/As, pax

14. Recruise by inserting same cost index

15. Landing gear down - check triple indicator

16. Monitor Autobrakes

17. *general sim reminder: if you have a basic sim, it won't make the 100' above and minimum callouts for you. So, PM make sure you're ready to speak up on that. Even running in #2 for all three events, it still caught both me and the CA on a few spots.

18. slides in the "Walk Around" presentation

19. First two days in the sim are exactly as shown for each of the spots. First day is basically training so anything that needs to be repeated can be. Very low stress. Know your triggers and flows same as others have said. They are really wanting to see adherence to SOP's, make sure you know them and training will be a breeze.

The MO session was very easy and low stress and plenty of time to get everything done. RAD involved hot brakes after takeoff and some door issues. Apparently crews are diverting for door ECAM because there isn't really anything to do on the ecam and crews NOT going to the follow ups which have you determine if you have a pressurization issue. If there's a pressurization issue, then divert is good call, otherwise continue to destination.

20. sim instructor did show us a neat trick to pre-set the engine-out missed approach procedure. Page through the flight plan to the first blue item on the missed approach. Insert JFK11 on top of that point. Then enter JFK11/180/25 as the next point and enter it in the MCDU. Finally, press the overfly pushbutton and put that on top of the JFK11. Now, in the event of a single-engine miss, you'll have guidance for that turn. Just remember that it is a track and not a heading that is displayed on the ND and if you miss the approach, you'll have to set that 180 heading after you get the turn completed.

  

August 29, 2021

Day 1 thru 3 as advertised. Training environment. Great instructors.

Day 4, did DCA to BOS, minor CDL on release, missing static wick. TO alt JFK, alt of JFK. Brief DCA required items from company pages, set up Pliva fix and engine out TO in secondary flt plan. Lights on for runway crossing. Note blue NAV. Green NAV after takeoff. Mod turbulence report from another aircraft, call FA's "mod turbulence procedures in effect", changed altitude to lower, smooth then. Talk to FA's again to update them. ECAM eng bleed issue. "Avoid icing" result. Loss of wing anti ice still had engine anti ice. Conferred with dispatch and MOC via crew phone on iPad. No icing forecast or reported. Opted to continue to BOS. ILS 33L. Landed and turned off runway hold short of other runway. Once stopped holding short, ride was done.

Rest of period was the training items as described in the training documents. EGE items, windshear, stalls etc. Very relaxed, only stress involved is what you do to yourself as long as you show up prepared.

August 3, 2021

Just finished CQ on 08/02/21. Excellent experience and good training. RTS/MO/RAD just like the script. Call outs, triggers, and flows are stressed throughout as barriers for the ABC method. As always, know those and you're 90% there. I went through the published briefings for all 3 days and knew all the right answers ahead of time. Lots of TPS scenarios so I'd recommend both FO and CAPT have a good understanding of the TPS. Everything is a training event other than the LOE.

LOE was BOS-DCA. Cold so use engine anti ice. Never got to DCA. SE taxi off gate B16 for 15R told to taxi via EB hood short of N. Started second engine on B. Runway change to 22L. Both had headwinds. Told to taxi 22L and cross 15R at N. I asked to continue to hold short of N to change the box. Granted. After making changes, debriefed, rerun checklist, then taxied to 22L with a couple hold short clearances in between. All lights on when crossing and don't be doing anything other than looking "clear left,clear right". Don’t forget to do the required anti ice engine run ups. Normal TO. Engine anti ice off as temps warmed in climb, then back on. Climb and cruise seemed to stress turbulence procedures. Pireps of turb ahead and you get some moderate. Capt called FAs "moderate turbulence procedures". As flying pilot I slowed down ahead of time. FMS speed is too fast at over 300K. Use FOM standard phraseology with FA. After that we were given a crossing restriction to a fix ahead at 20000. And low and behold just before it's time to start down the IDG overtemps. Obviously the flying pilot needs to focus on flying and start down when required. Confirm the switch as it is red guarded. APU won't start. One electric source now so we divert. Asked for PHL weather it was 600-2 so CAT I and ok to use. It was. Notified dispatch via ACARS then I called ops above 10K and, unlike in the real world, they knew we were coming and gave us gate B10. Normal ILS 9L and landing. Taxi to gate. Done. No gotchyas but the scenario does require you to manage the situation between the crew. Hope this helps.

July 18, 2021

Just finished medium RQEM in Dallas. Our MO was done in BOS with RNAV (RNP) in LGA. The LOE was BOS - DCA and DCA -CLT. Lost oil pressure #2 engine on leg 2. Shut it down and diverted to RIC.
All instructors and CKA very professional. Good experience.

June 20, 2021

Just completed CQT in Dallas

Everything was previously discussed in regards to:

Day 2 (Sim): Maneuvers Training (RTS)
Day 3 (Sim): Maneuvers Observation (MO)
Day 4 (Sim): CQ Line Operational Evaluation (LOE/RLE) plus Advanced Training (RAD)

For our RLE sim ride we had # 15-6 DCA to BOS with a IDG overheat/APU won't start @ altitude/divert into JFK (ILS 13L).

Land 13L @ JFK and taxi off the runway make a few turns with ground control and stop on the taxiway. Ride over.

No problems getting off the gate @ DCA. Just conduct the mandatory briefings for the all the EO and airspace found in the company pages on your IPad.

Load EO SID (10-7 pages) into the secondary flight plan to include one mile ring around PLIVA on the fix page.

NAV in blue (call that out) before you take-off Runway 1. 200 feet on departure NAV in green (call that out) and engage autopilot @ 100 feet AFL.
The sim is rough when you hit the turbulence. Slow down and ask for lower and it magically smooths out.

SIM P and CKA's were laid back and definitely wanted this to be a relaxed training environment.

All hands on deck flying the line right now (shortage of pilots as we all know) so it seems like the CKA's want you to succeed BUT be prepared and you will do fine!

June 19, 2021

RLE DCA-BOS no gotchas. Depart 01, do all briefs and verify nav 3 times. Just prior to JFK we got #1 IDG overheat which led to disconnect. APU wouldn’t start. Divert to JFK. Used crew phone for dispatch. Communicate with 2 in, 2 out and back up with OD pages. Weather, Box, Brief and set up for the ILS approach. Very straight forward and relaxed check airman. Rad was straight from the script. Know the maneuvers call outs! It makes things go smoothly. Treat the end of a wind shear event exactly like a go around and clean up without overspeeding.

June 15, 2021

We just completed our recurrent training in Dallas. Everything that has been previously noted remained accurate for our entire footprint of training, with the exception of the RLE portion of the RLE/RAD.

With the newly authorized use of scenarios 15-1, 15-2 and 15-3, we were given scenario 15-1. The paperwork for all three remains the same, just different scenarios, no gotchas.

Scenario 15-1 is Gate B-16 in Boston, operating shuttle flight to DCA. (some sims are programmed to be at B-10, but ours (Sim #2) was B-16. SOP's for departure from the gate. It's 10 degrees Celsius outside and a half mile visibility, so engine anti ice ON for operations. Taxi to 15L for departure, the 22's are closed for inspection. Somewhere along the way (ahem, after you run the Before Takeoff Checklist), you get notified that new ATIS information D current, and you will now be departing off of 22L. You have the data in the TPS, no gotchas. Revalidate the flight plan, reconfirm the numbers, rerun the checklist.

Took off, anti ice off and then back on climbing through temperature inversions, no biggy. Cruise altitude is 30,000 feet. On climb, ATC amended our altitude to 26,000 feet and assigned that as our final altitude. I sent a message to dispatch giving our new cruise altitude and fuel on board for updated "enroute flight progress data". I asked how rides were ahead, was told intermittent chop with occasional moderate turbulence between 22,000 and 38,000. I immediately notified #1 flight attendant and advised them of flight time remaining and to begin using "MODERATE TURBULENCE PROCEDURES" for the remaining 44 minutes of flight, followed by a PA to the passengers. Got a few jolts, but was told that we did everything we were supposed to do, so wasn't anything worse than occasional light chop the rest of the way to DCA. Normal arrival planning and crossing restrictions for the CLIPR and for the ILS 01. After everything was briefed for the arrival and approach, we begin our descent and received an Amber CAS message- AIR ENG 1 BLEED LEAK. FIX strategy. Followed up with QRH. Followed up with Supplemental Manual. Discussed together. At this point we were 44 miles from DCA, elected to call maintenance for the early alert heads up, gave them ETA and gate, pretended to write it up in the book. Wrapped up by 11,000-ish feet. Weather in DC was overcast and 12 degrees Celsius. Asked ATC if any reported icing conditions on descent (message says to "avoid icing conditions") - none were reported and the temperatures remained good the whole way in. Vectors to ILS 01. Land. Exiting the runway, we were originally assigned gate 26, check airman says that's a typo, to park at 25, no different than a normal gate change. Pull in, park, checklist - Done.

All paperwork, ATIS information, clearance, close out- everything needed is in the packet online or on Comply365. It's also sent to you when you request it in the plane via the ACARS printer, as normal. No gotchas. No Easter eggs. Just do it how the book says for us to and get a pat on the back at the end. Very calm, gentlemanly and normal. RAD portion, exactly the same as previously discussed. Have fun!

 
June 7, 2021

CLT Sim #1
Scenario 15-3 BOS- DCA divert to PHL

Fight plan and TPS very straight forward. Normal start off Gate B-16, verbage for push crew needs to be verbatim. Taxi out to RWY 15R via E1 K B L. Normal procedures until RWY change to 22L. Elected to stop and reload the box and rerun Before Takeoff Checklist. Multiple runway crossings so make sure you adhere to FOM. Don't go below the line until you have crossed 22R and watch your Min T/O fuel. We had a sim issue which caused us to sit idling for 15 minutes. Normal A-I on Takeoff to a HDG and RV to the first fix. Accomplish all normals until level off. After level off and Seatbelt sign off; begin getting Moderate Chop; turn on seatbelt sign and tell flight attendants "Moderate Turbulence Procedures until we can change alt and find smother air" Make a PA to the pax and then try to change altitude. Dropped down 2k' smoothed out. ELAC 1 and 2 fault which was a Sim fault (not planned). We ran the ECAM per SOP and both reset. Shortly thereafter IDG #1 overheat with APU auto-shutdown. Make sure you run the APU shutdown ECAM and follow-ups. Declare Pan Pan Pan with ATC and coordinate with dispatch for a divert to PHL for wx and Notams, (used crew phone) Used OD pages as follow ups for the diversion. Talk to the FAs, Talk to the Pax etc ... ILS 9L to stop on the rwy and subsequently taxi to the gate. We had other issues with the Sim which made it more difficult but handle it as you would in the real world.

 
June 6, 2021

CLT: Great info previously provided, nothing to add except BOS-DCA RLE's have resumed as of June 1st. Just a word of encouragement, I had a seat filler all three days and all Sim P's and Check Airman were great to work with! Positive, low stress environment great for learning. You will have a pleasant experience so don't sweat it!

 
May 31, 2021

First and foremost, THANK YOU for all you do to make training drama free!

Day 1: All classroom. Review the systems slideshow and the highlights of each system in Volume II and you'll be the teacher's pet and not have that 1000-yard blank stare in your eyes while wishing you had studied. Easy. Lots of performance questions regarding what is and is not acceptable in TPS data. Review the TPS section of the OD pages and when in doubt, "get a new TPS" is always correct.

Day 2: Formerly known as "First Look". It's all maneuvers, mostly out of KMCO. Study the OD pages for GPS, RNP, and LOC approaches. A short review of the procedures for Managed Non-ILS and Non-Managed Non-ILS in Volume I is useful. Our SIM-P had a technique for the LOC approach to put the FPV / Bird up relatively early and come down relatively quick to FAF crossing altitude by using 5.0 - 5.5% GPA all the way down FAF altitude. As long as you're configured, it works GREAT. There is no race and no ridiculous speed assignment to 5-mile final in the sim. Configure early, configure often, fly slow. SE work is also straight forward. Don't forget to brief the FA's. We did one at JFK with an EO Missed. You are expected to fly the procedure. Be sure the fix is depicted, fly to it, make the turn to the published heading, clean up, run ECAM procedures, brief the FA's, set up / brief the next approach, land the sim, get a cookie. No sweat.

Day 3: MVO. More of the same as Day 2 plus the ILS PRM into ORD flown by the FO for training so that AA can be approved to allow FO's to fly this approach. You WILL get a descending breakout! Automation off, turn towards the assigned heading while initiating a relatively shallow descent, PM selects but DOES NOT pull or manage the assigned altitude. WHEN you get an RA, fly the commands for the RA even if they are contrary to the ATC assigned breakout maneuver. Rebuild automation. Do it again and this time with a climbing breakout. Lots of talking and changing of automation level at low altitude, but completely doable.

Day 4: LOFT / RAD. The slide show is on the order of 120 or so pages. Ridiculous. We got DCA - BOS with the high IDG temp in cruise. Do the entire ad nauseum briefing for departing 01 at DCA, don't skip anything. We went through the briefing relatively slowly, so the CKA applied some time pressure. Tell them you'll be ready when you're ready. They need to hear you talk about looking for NAV on the PFD three times - after the box is loaded, while taking the runway, and immediately after takeoff. TURN ON THE AUTOPILOT at 400' - no brownie points for not penetrating the PLAVIA while hand flying. Some little distractors in the setup INCLUDING a load closeout with a TO CG that is over 2% different than what the FAC's show. The tolerance is 5%, so it's a valid closeout. Once you're up and away from DCA, you get cleared to a couple fixes down the road. During climb, it gets bumpy. "LIGHT TURBULENCE PROCEDURES". Not "it's a little choppy" or "you guys be careful, it's getting bumpy", or ANY words other than "LIGHT TURBULENCE PROCEDURES". Then it gets really rough. "MODERATE TURBULENCE PROCEDURES". Then the IDG overheats. Run the ECAM with the appropriate script and disconnect the CSD per the procedure and the APU is not going to start. Run THAT ECAM, too. You are down to one generator. "PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN" not "uhhhh, we're down to one generator". Divert to JFK, notify dispatch, review wx and NOTAM's, fly ILS, land, taxi in, get a cookie. Easy. The big takeaways are time compression and the need to complete the ECAM procedures AND Follow Up's (if applicable) for both the IDG overheat and the APU failure to start. Also important is proper verbiage to FA's regarding turbulence, and notification of dispatch that you're diverting.

RAD is straightforward. Mostly in KLAS. Windshear escape and demonstration of PWS. You can ask for course deviations to avoid depicted PWS. Cleaning up following the escape maneuver without a flap overspeed takes some focus. Hand flown departure with all automation off for the FO, hand flown arrival with all automation off for the CA. They don't make you fly all of it, they just want to see you make a couple speed and altitude restrictions as published with all the magic turned off. All you guys that hate hand flying are going to have your hands full ... A couple "upsets" due to wake turbulence - don't use the rudder. High altitude stalls. Don't raise the nose too soon and get a secondary stall. Unusual attitudes are now induced by the sim instead of your training partner. Don't use the rudder. Don't overstress the airplane. Don't forget your line in all of these maneuvers "MY AIRCRAFT". Disconnect automation as needed, rebuild automation when appropriate.

Last of the takeaways: They are emphasizing standard verbiage, flying without automation or disconnecting it when needed - then re-establishing it when appropriate. They are also emphasizing the "Gotcha's" with TPS data. As always, review Go-Around procedures, single engine procedures, runway assessments, and OD pages.

Overall, a straight-forward event that is nearly stress free with a little studying in advance.

 
May 4, 2021

GSW RQES (CQT w/ an extra day on the virtual trainer refreshing systems and calls). Great experience. LOE 15-4 Airbleed, no factor. Not much to add that hasn't already been written; it's ALL still good relevant info.

 
May 4, 2021

The gouge thus far has been spot on. Only diff for us was on the LE:

- CKA gave us a choice of what profile we wanted to fly (DCA landing in BOS, or DCA diverting to JFK)
- Instead of IDG issue, we had the dreaded AIR ENG 1 BLEED LEAK. No divert to JFK and no G/A on approach to BOS. Recommend the FO be the PF ... the CA is busy with calls to FAs, Pax & Dispatch due to the turbulence procedures, lower altitude due to turbulence, the Non-Normal, on top of the normal procedures on this short leg.

 
May 4, 2021

Not much to add to the other great intel. The PRM location was changed to ORD using ILS PRM Y 10R. Descending breakout for both of us. There is no longer a PRM in SFO.

 
April 25, 2021

There has been a change in regards to the PRM approach in SFO. That approach has been decommissioned and now they are using the ORD ILS PRM Y10R. No biggie as you really don't do the full approach ... just a break out maneuver.

 
April 18, 2021

Just finished the new 4 day program at CLT.
All intel is spot on. I'll try to provide some updates.

Day 1: The systems slides for class are on the AA training website and are very good for reviewing before training. Slides are scenario based and will cover everything you will see in the simulator. The Disrupting Everyday Bias listing on my schedule was actually called "Pilot Culture Advantage" and was supposedly a follow on to Everyday Bias. Joint Crew Training and RHF were standard.

Day2: RTS went per the script. The only comment I have is the sim instructor made it difficult to get into a good flow. Constant interruptions, comments, simulator resets, etc. Sim instructor forgot to set the weather correctly on one approach causing a redo. This put us behind the timeline and we didn"t take a break. Personally I think they crammed too much stuff into this sim because the first half of the MO is the same events except at KMCO instead of KJFK.

Day 3: Maneuvers Observation went per the script. Easy, no surprises. The RNAV(RNP) Z RWY 13R is about the curved leg on the missed approach and the 185 max speed. Apparently we will start seeing more RNAV missed approaches on the approach charts now. The KDFW visual approach in gusty winds is a setup trying to get you to overspeed the flaps. Put your gear down early!!! KEGE stuff was challenging if you've never been there. The bad visuals in Sim 3 don't give you a good representation of the terrain. Transitioning from the LDA 25 to the visual pattern…review it…!

Day 4: LOE was DCA-BOS #6. Everything is DCA-BOS right now until they change the heading on the evaluation form. There is no BOS-DCA header, so apparently they are not allowed to fly that scenario yet…? I guess pen and ink changes are not allowed on the evaluation form. Anyway the LOE itself was takeoff out of DCA RWY1, brief all the stuff out of DCA, taxi out, takeoff, SID all uneventful. Expect moderate turbulence and the Capt does his notifications to the FAs. After it smooths out we had the IDG temp advisory, overheat ECAM. The APU failed to start, we were down to 1 generator and diverted to JFK ILS 13L. It gets busy because you are close to JFK at FL270 or somewhere in the 20"s, and the Capt has to do all the Capt stuff. Take your time descending, don"t hurry, ask for a vector (not approved), so I asked for holding. Held at BUZON while we finished up with all the checks and notifications. This also allowed to slow things down, get down to a good altitude for the approach. BUZON is only about 12 miles from JFK. Uneventful approach and landing, taxi clear, flaps up, get on taxiway A, then its over! Dont relax on the runway, play it out another minute!!!

RAD went per the script. No surprises. Got done with both the LOE and RAD in 2 hours!

Check 6!

 
April 13, 2021

Just did 15-5. IDG 1 OHT during flight to BOS fr DCA. All else was about same. One other thing, we got mod turblnc at altitude and requested lower. It was granted but more than 4,000 feet. Remember to inform disp for fuel calcs.

RGS, RTS, MO, & RLE all performed in Dallas

 
April 7, 2021

In general the spots laid out in the summary on this site are accurate. My observations are based on class in CLT and sim in 320#2.

Ground: Ground school is fairly basic and mostly unchanged from years past. Bias training is active again, but it's no longer Disrupting Everyday Bias. It is now "Pilot Culture Advantage". The instructor said it's the same basic premise as the original class, but a less intense format. I can't make any personal observations on that as I managed to avoid the original my last few cycles.

Sim-RTS:
spot 2) The big thing here is they want you to know who's outside and who's inside on a CAT3 and for the FO to know their calls.

spot 6) A couple things on this RNAV. When you're doing the setup & brief, that want to see you checking the required equipment as well as the usual briefing stuff. Also, I rushed my review of OD-15 in regards to the speed limits in regards to RF legs inside the final approach fix. In a situation with an RF segment inside the FAF, the category speed restrictions apply the whole way from FAF inbound, not just the RF leg.

spot 8) We performed the descending breakout without issue but got caught by the Airbus logic when trying to comply with further heading and alt. assignments after the initial maneuver. The CA elected to use the soft go around methodology to comply at this point, which works except that taking the thrust levers to TOGA activates the GA mode and switches to NAV even when you're trying to fly a heading. We caught it and pulled heading again, no harm no foul. When we di my breakout, I tried it just using selected speed and heading. It worked fine and the instructor said either way would work, the selected just seemed to have less potential for error in my opinion.

*general sim reminder: if you have a basic sim, it won't make the 100' above and minimum callouts for you. So, PM make sure you're ready to speak up on that. Even running in #2 for all three events, it still caught both me and the CA on a few spots.

SIM-MO
spot 6) The big goal here is to run the ECAM, then the QRH follow-ups, then discuss with MTC/dispatch as necessary before you make a decision to carry on or return. Per the instructor there has been an increasing number of crews making unnecessary returns for similar events that actually didn't require a return.

spot 7) The overheat happens SLOW. This may be a programming issue with the spot, but after several minutes in the air and nearing the FLs, the instructor finally just said "ding" to have us go through the motions because the brakes hadn't even gotten to 250 yet. The big takeaway here is to be aware of BOTH speed restrictions on moving the gear. The ECAM will tell you both while it's displayed but it goes away once the overheat condition no longer exists. So just remember 250 going down, 220 going up and plan/maneuver accordingly and you're fine.

spot 8) This spot seems designed to check you're reaction to an impending overspeed on final and unlike the brake hot scenario, it happens FAST. By that I mean if you don't see it as soon as the speed starts trending up, it happens so quickly that you may not prevent the overspeed. The good news is that the desired takeaway is that they mainly want to see you taking some sort of corrective action when you notice it such as using gear, speed brakes, push to level off, etc.

spot 9) On the downwind to final turn don't necessarily set the heading to the full 180degree turn like you probably would do for the upwind to downwind turn to start the visual pattern. Being fully configured by the EGE25D point lets the plane turn tight enough that it will actually point you at terrain on the W side of town. My suggestion, set you're heading for about a 45degree base to final and adjust from there.

SIM-LOE/RAD
LOE) I kept hearing rumors around the training center that the LOE spots were limited to just the DCA-BOS legs because of a slipup in the approval process on the new 4 day program. We got 15-5 and it was basically as advertised. Depart DCA and some turbulence on the sid climb. We never got the moderate that others have mentioned, but the CA had briefed the FAs to stay seated and wait for the chime. At cruise, we got an idg overheat and rand the ecam to the disconnect along with successfully starting the APU. With the APU running we still have 2 gens, so continue to BOS. Lots of heading and alt vectors along the star, just pay attention and and remember where you are and what the plane is doing when you send it to a new fix. Light visual approach, be configured and ready for the tight turn to final and you'll be fine. From short final we got a tower directed GA for traffic spacing, executed a soft-GA as we had briefed and vectors back to visual 33L. I had the CA load up the ILS for a backup to the visual, ATC vectored us to final just outside the marker and landed without issue.

RAD) All as advertised. Point of note, knowing the pitch/power targets helps with the unreliable airspeed spot. Even knowing it's coming, this one still has a pretty good startle factor and having just a little bit to help you start to stabilize while your partner is running the QRC & QRH helps settle things down.

April 3, 2021

The training was excellent as usual and low stress from simp's and checkairman. Most of the gotchas are already discussed by prior crews. Some emphasis items I noticed are:

1) Being aware of RNAV speeds during and after missed approach, nothing new but they chose RNAV's that require speed for arc segments.
2) Runway lighting on wind shear events regarding runway remaining (last 3000' alternating red/white centerline lights, last 2000' amber edge lights, last 1000' red centerline lights)
3) Rejecting for predictive wind shear (if the plane talks to you after 80kts, most likely reject)
4) Turbulance procedures
5) Over speed of flaps and gear
6) Max flap extension altitude (20,000' airbus will not display flap speeds above 20k which is also a good reminder)
7) Something I learned, some aircraft show RAIM but it cannot be used. (GPS predictive page, if green "Y" then RAIM is good

GS: The only thing I will add is that all aircraft QRC checklists are now blue. (Used to be tan or blue depending on which aircraft had the mod for undue activation of alpha protection) This is in regards to SEL 28 on release.

RTS: explained very well from previous descriptions so I will just add observations from my GSW training event.

Spot 1: SE Taxi. They are witnessing FO's on the line accomplishing after start flows too soon. It is a spot for policy regarding single engine taxi when prudent and to start your flow at the correct "trigger", not before.

Spot 2: low visibility T/O and CAT II approach. Main point already discussed is that you need visual reference for landing and that the NFP (FO) should not make any visual call outs (only CA), unlike all other approaches that are not autoland, (ie CAT II and III approaches). You must also ensure you have a takeoff alternate. All CAT II and III approaches need land app. Some considerations, CA can taxi in visibility as low as he/she is comfortable with but must be at that airport T/O minimums for departure. This can also be lower than landing minimums (ie: KMCO). Another good to know item is that you need to see CAT3 single or dual in order to conduct a CAT II approach (OD-18) shows you exactly what FMA will display for requirement. We can conduct approaches with CAT II displayed in FMA but it would be a CAT I approach due to our airlines requirement to autoland on all CAT II and CAT III approaches.

Spot 4/5: V2 cut for FO and unfortunately first time they fly the sim. My partner did an excellent job but I thought it was strange that they are not letting the FO's get a feel of the sim before a V2 cut. Nothin new but just need to remember to pitch down to 12.5 degrees. We all know the drill with VI cuts but a good quick action if there is no time to accomplish non routine landing is 2 in/2 out (notify flight attendants and passengers/ dispatch and ATC)

Spot 7: Localizer approach. Nothing to add except NFP has PERF page up to monitor how high and low you are on path but green dot accomplishes that as well. Described well in previous posts regarding set up.

Spot 8: PRM Approaches, CA gets descending breakout, just remember "Breakout" and FO receives climbing maneuver "Breakout Toga". Also described in detail regarding TA or RA by others. Just remember to comply with RA and then continue with missed approach

MO:

Spot 1: already explained well regarding T/O Alternate

Spot 2: RTO, pretty uneventful if call outs are made by FO and CA executes PA "This is the captain remain seated, remain seated, remain seated".

Spot 3: same as day before except for single engine go around.

Spot 4: straight forward and excellent post already on land app set up for hydraulic failure.

Spot 5: same as day prior

Spot 6: Easy spot just don't overthink it. QRH says to continue with normal pressurization so you just need to notify MX.

Spot 7: Also discussed in detail. Considerations are speed, 210kts to bring gear up because of our policy of -10 and not accelerating. Also communicate with center regarding gear and speed as well as flight attendants and possibly passengers.

Spot 8: uneventful

Spot 9: more of a training demo regarding set up for approach and missed so no need to overstudy. Main takeaway is runway lighting that you have to activate and masking correct calls at uncontrolled field ie "Eagle traffic, American XX 2 mile final Eagle"

RLE:

We had DCA-BOS, no runway change, temp 15. Checkairman tries to keep you busy. We got a report of moderate turbulence above our cruising altitude. We requested a lower altitude and was granted our request but you get unexpected moderate turbulence anyway. Make sure to notify dispatch for new fuel burn under 4K. I had briefed flight attendants on ground regarding turbulence and called the flight attendants in flight to notify them of light turbulence procedures and time based on report of "some turbulence below FL 260 and moderate reported at FL 270" we were FL200 per request. Encountered moderate turbulence anyway and made a PA "flight attendants, be seated immediately" we discussed in debrief and checkairman seemed very satisfied with turbulence handling. The takeaway I got was that you are going to get an unexpected turbulence event so just follow procedures. We then got an IDG disconnect which is a confirm item and APU auto shut down on start so we had to divert (went to JFK). It doesn't matter who flies but the FO and I discussed having FO fly, just easier because our procedures prefer the FOs to fly during non normal events for the most part anyway but it is CA discretion. Pretty straight forward, just continuously busy throughout event.

RAD:

Spot 1: unreliable airspeed, same as last year. Checkairman took us though all 3 types (BKUP SPD, BUSS EQUIP, and neither BKUP SPD/ALT aircraft)...this was a demo as he explained how detail oriented it would be with basic aircraft as NFP would be continuously looking over charts for power settings through different phases of flight. It was a great demonstration and nothing you have to really prepare for.

Spot 2: Wind shear events much like last years event.

Spot 3: Slow flight demo and full stalls. This is much like the first event we had with full stalls and treated as a learning event. It was a great recap on how aggressive you need to be on full stalls.

Spot 4: Upset recovery. Uneventful

Spot 5: CA descent on Tyssn arrival I believe with minor upset recovery from wake turbulence, straight forward.

Spot 6: High altitude, high energy go around. You do not need to do a soft go around, mostly a demonstration to level off or slow climb and cleanup.

April 2, 2021 DFW

RTS (Day 2 of 4 in training)
Sim pre-briefing was directly from the slides, no surprises. CKA was extremely low key, friendly and knowledgeable. Suggest you chair fly Missed Approaches a few times for both PM and PF duties, this was a big repeat item all throughout training. Apparently, people are pilots are electing to continue unstabilized. We talked about it over the table since this is a HOT Topic and sure as heck both FO and CA didn't call positive rate for gear retraction at least one time each. Beyond that, we discussed how folks are unwilling to go-around 94% of the time. It's hard to do every single thing right especially with all the IC's and repositioning. Attitude!
When we got in the sim, we were given a few minutes to get set up but inevitably, when he told us to do the 10 minute-prior checks, both the FO and I were a bit clunky. I forgot to put fuel pumps on and beacon but CKA was totally cool and reasoned that we are not operating form a point of reality, our time was compressed…no excuse.
SPOT 1: Push back from gate 41 was normal, single engine taxi to 22R was instructed and halfway down A, the vis went low so I directed the start of engine 2 to preclude distractions during low vis. We confirmed performance for 22R at intersection F and pulled up short of the runway to do checklists.
SPOT 2: (CA takeoff) Cleared for takeoff and immediately given vectors for a ILS CAT II to 22L due to weather of 1600 RVR. Set up and briefed the approach. Don't forget to Activate Approach after selecting new destination. Take it slow, there's plenty of time. Uneventful CAT II Auto Land.
SPOT 3: Next was CA from 22R again. Gusty X-Winds. We had Ventilation Extraction Fan fail with the associated ECAM. FO flew and CA did FIX. After selecting OVRD, ECAM cleared and there was no status remaining. EP over. Vectors to VOR 31L with strong winds from 220. The Final approach course was ~30 degrees from runway heading. FD guidance is only good down to minimums so brief turning off the FD and selecting FPA. Anticipate the turn to Final and try not to overshoot. No big deal to fly this, it's an exercise in transitioning from IMC to VMC and maneuvering.
SPOT 4: FO takeoff, first opportunity to fly. Engine Fail during second segment. Sim P told us it activates when the gear is raised. Standard stuff, no complications. CA needs to remember all briefings to FA's (2 Dings to brief #1, No TEST Briefing was needed) and passengers as appropriate. Keep the message low-key and try to avoid use of words like emergency, evacuation…Keep it short but don't neglect it.
After a break.
SPOT 5: Runway 22R CA takeoff, Engine Fail/Fire Between V1 and V2. Single Engine CAT I ILS, Land
SPOT 6: FO Takeoff 22R Gusty X-Winds, Electrical Non-Normal (IDG #1 OVHT) The first indication something is wrong is the fact that the Electrical page illuminates on lower ECAM. If you look closely, you'll see its an advisory for IDG Temp. The Ding happened shortly afterwards and the ECAM came up. Once again, I gave the FO the plane and ran the ECAM which had me disconnect the #1 IDG. Don't forget <3seconds on the disconnect. Nothing more to do for ECAM procedures and the CKA was suggesting we might consider checking with dispatch to consider continuing to destination. If you start APU you're back to 2 generator operations but it's CA call whether to continue or not. At least have the discussion. RNAV (RNP) AR 13R was the approach. FO flew it. A few learning points. First off, be sure to look at company pages to verify legality and crosscheck SEL. There is an Specific Authorization required by the FAA to do this approach (It's in the CO pages). Verify Temperature is within range. Check Approach Category and ensure you would be legal for a CAT D. If so, don't exceed 165 before RWY threshold if you have to go Missed Approach, then there is a speed restriction to not exceed 210 till TIHWO so there are a few things to think about. Read all the notes! As a general rule check: Company Pages, SEL and ATIS before beginning set up for any Approach.
SPOT 8: We slewed to SFO and did the PRM approach to 28R to allow FO to do the breakout. CA did one too…No big deal! Don't pull Altitude when acting as PM. Select new heading and be sure to hand fly the missed if you're PF. Reconfigure when time permits, there is no urgency.
CKA asked if we'd like to do anything more, we finished 25 minutes early. CA did one more V1 Cut before we called it a day.

Maneuvers Observation (MO)
Pre-brief was right from the slides. Picked up a few good points. Further emphasis on CAT III and RNAV procedures. My take-away: don't brief every word in the OD pages, get comfortable doing the Reverse Z Double D set up and brief only that which is peculiar. (we got pinched for time during the first half of sim briefing RNAV ad nauseum. Reviewed takeoff weather mins for MCO low vis takeoff. Be sure to know where to verify TO wx minimums on page 20-9A at MCO. Reviewed proper call outs for RNAV approaches. Reviewed actual distances per deviation (Page OD-30). Where to look and what pages to monitor for PM and PF. Discussed use of FMGC VREF and CG analysis for Non-Normal Landing Assessments. Good table-top discussion.
SPOT 1: Wx at MCO, RVR 5,5,5. CA takeoff, low vis, runway 36R Take off alternate is required. TPA was selected. Go to PROG page and enter TPA to verify distance to TPA is within limits (368 miles for a 320). Once airborne, CKA instructed us to reset destination to MCO and prepare for ILS CAT III to Rwy 36R. Weather improved to 6,6,6 Did a CAT III Autoland, no issues.
SPOT 2: FO takeoff 36R, Engine fail second segment, SE pattern to a Go Around, alternate Missed Approach. Vectors to CAT I ILS 36R.
SPOT 3: FO takeoff, 2nd segment engine fail. SE pattern to a go-around, missed approach followed by a CAT I ILS to MCO 36R
SPOT 4: CA TO with Gusts, Hyd Fail (forgot the actual ECAM). FO flew again and CA handled the FIX. LOC Approach runway 36R. Self-admission. CKA gave us a position freeze just outside of the fix before the FAF with a step down. I got a little behind and ended up hand-flying initial descent portion using FPA. It was not standard but I recovered before 1000' and we did the LOC approach to a go-around. Lesson for myself; chair fly the LOC approach or practice it on a visual approach, so I'm more comfortable with the use of Vert speed and step down fixes.
SPOT 5: CA takeoff, V1 Engine Fail. Held the plane on the runway for a few extra potatoes while I confirmed which foot to press and when we got airborne was able to maintain HDG pretty easily while we did the procedures. Again, After initial response, FO flew and CA FIX'd. ILS 36R CAT I land.
Break
SPOT 6: Pre-positioned in DFW, Runway 17R. DFW-EGE was the plan. FO takeoff, Door Warning ECAM at 10,000 climbing out. Pretty much a non-event after ensuring the plane was pressurizing. Bad micro-switch in the Cargo Door.
SPOT 7: CA take off nor mal climb-out to a RNAV (RNP) Z 13R. General suggestion for this training when briefing approaches: CKA don't need to hear you read every single note, warning, and caution on OD pages. Just those things that matter. Keep briefings at a reasonable length, you'll have more time for redo's if necessary. One gotcha on the RNAV, read the fine print on the MAP…do not exceed 185 until HRNTT. No big deal just pay attention.
SPOT 8: FO take off with an ECAM for Brakes Hot after around 11,000. Very benign. Lower gear at A/S at or below 250 and limit speed to 280mtill brakes cool. The gotcha is retraction speed because once the brakes cool, the ECAM goes away completely. Technique, lower the standby compass as a reminder. CKA reminded me to advise pax what was going on… EP over.
SPOT 9: Both pilots flew Vis approaches to 18L at DFW. Unremarkable events.
SPOT 10: Eagle, CO. We did an Eagle check out. Discussed the LDA 25 procedures in depth. CKA discussed all the pitfalls and hazards IAW CO pages and warnings on the plates. He had us set up for the visual approach by creating a point on left downwind to turn left to if we should have to go missed approach. The preference is to fly a left hand Vis pattern versus the entire Missed Approach procedure since weather is usually good before even going there. He also had us create a pseudo final approach course in the secondary FP by selecting the Runway 25 as a fly-to point and extending a line out to infinity so that we could have at least a back up to a glide slope. There is a whole page devoted to Visual Pattern RWY 255 on 10-7B-5. Then he pre-positioned us outside of AQULA and we flew the LDA and we commenced the approach 5 mile final he told us to expect a go-around since there was a plane on the runway. We leveled off at 8500 and turned lefty to the point we created and then flew a left base. FO will have to make all Advisory calls since tower is unmanned. Go over appropriate verbiage from your light aircraft days. CKA had us set the SE Missed Approach in the Secondary Flight Plan because we might lose an engine on a go-around. Once on final, we got a report from a 172 that there were chipmunks on the runway and I executed a go-around. As soon as I reset the Thrust to Climb, Boom #1 engine fails, now we're no-kidding doing the SE Missed which is a circuitous procedure. I took a few extra seconds to put the Thrust Levers back to TOGA and it was a great exercise in how critical that is. We got a GPWS during the escape but we had no choice but to continue. There is a note about not changing configuration and don't level off, accelerate or retract flaps till APRES on the MAP. Lesson for myself: TOGA, TOGA, TOGA in mountainous terrain. It was a good familiarization for me not having been there before. FOM says I still have to fly with a check airman but at least I've seen what's entailed.

RLE (LOFT)/RAD BOS-DCA
The briefing was very professional! My CKA was being evaluated by the FAA for recertification...greeeeaaat! I arrived about 30 minutes early to get my head in the game. The CKA came about 5 minutes later and couldn't have been more disarming. He explained that he was being "observed" and that it should be no big deal (right!) He put me totally at ease and we chatted a few minutes until the FAA guy arrived and we all talked about flying stuff. It was nice but it occurred to me this is still an eval and the CKA wasn't cutting any corners. Sure enough, when the brief commenced, Slide #1, the CKA looked right at me and asked me to explain what the TEM model was about. I gave a few boiler plate answers about barriers, tools and safety making sure to leave room for the FO to chime in and he did. It was a softball question but I knew he needed to show the FAA guy he was engaging us. We got questions all the way through this briefing which lasted 1+40. We had a few questions about TPS, Weight and balance, RNAV approach naming conventions, plus a few other softballs throughout and eventually we had a couple walk-around questions. Bottom line: If you read the slides and pay attention to where there might be questions, you'll be fine. The FAA guy complimented the CKA and us for being prepared. CKA gave us each a printed version of all documents we'd need for the eval including a CDL for static wicks. Be sure you make it clear you at least addressed this by checking MEL/CDL. All ground ops were totally normal. We briefed all CO pages including checking the FMA for Nav Blue before taxiing and NAV green at or before 200'. Plugged in PLVIA with a 1 DME ring and alternate/engine procedure in the Secondary (standard stuff) Completed ground ops. CKA told us to shoot for 1150 for off the gate and of course I didn't remember to start the PU until CKA dinged us like the MX guys always do to ask for permission to remove external power…Doh! No big deal. We finished all checklists and were off of Gate 25 at DCA, weather at DCA was IFR, NE winds no icing conditions.
We taxied to runway 01 via J, crossed Runway 4. Put lights on when crossing runway (Note: Be sure you're both outside while on the crossing runway, my FO was debriefed about looking inside while on the runway…very minor point but I feel like the CKA had to be sure to show the FAA guy he was looking at everything). FO Takeoff was totally normal. I suggested he consider using AP as soon after takeoff that he was comfortable. He did and departure was totally vanilla. Received a few vectors then after level off at 270, we got a radio call from DC Center about company reporting moderate turbulence 30 miles ahead. I asked for a lower altitude, not right now…We talked about the airspeed for turbulence penetration and sure enough, we entered what felt like light to occasion al moderate, nothing worse. Be sure to not only tell FA's but make a PA to pax about "Turbulence" ahead, not bumps or rough ride or any other slang term. I briefed the #1 but didn't make a PA because it was smooth when we got the call. The CKA just wanted us to show we knew about the newer procedures in FOM. I was expecting something to happen and frankly, the silence was unsettling but it wasn't until we passed JFK (first fix on ROBUC3) into Boston. Ok, we're just about committed to continue to destination now. Then, 'Ding' ECAM: AIR L WING BLEED LEAK The Blue section said only, Avoid Icing Conditions. FO was flying, He said "My aircraft" and I proceeded through the FIX. Honestly, the fact that it so abbreviated threw us both off. FO got on the radio and asked if Boston was reporting any icing conditions and the answer was no so we agreed to press on. The thing that made me uncomfortable was the fact that the PACK 1 button was illuminated with FAIL but there was no instruction to turn off the pack. FO suggested we start the APU as a backup for Bleed if we needed it so we waited till we were below FL200 and started the APU. I checked the ECAM Supplemental for something to do but that was our Non-Normal. We got vectors off the STAR and flew a non-event ILS to 33L cleared at R and as soon as I called for flaps up, CKA said we were done.
RAD was actually very helpful and with the FAA guy gone, it was more relaxed. Did the High Altitude slow flight/approach to stall, FO hand flew a SID and got an unplanned upset, I had to hand fly a portion of a STAR and again got an unplanned Upset. They call it a first look because they want you to respond without warning. We did a few GPWS escapes, and the last thing was a HOT Item, joining a glide slope from above. If this happens, level off immediately when cleared for the approach, be sure APP is armed, spin the FCU altitude to something above your altitude, then select maximum descent rate allowed (2000fpm) down and hope it recaptures before FAF or 1000'. We captured in plenty of time but we were told to go-around on final approach while descending. The drill is designed to emphasize how benign it should be. Don't go TOGA, just level off, set and pull heading and set new altitude. Reconfigure when you're stable again.

 
March 30, 2021

Thanks for Mar 18 report. Very accurate and detailed.

I would just add the following.

DCA-BOS scenario: received report of moderate turbulence, climbed to FL270. Once we encountered turbulence, the captain advised flight attendants to use moderate turbulence procedures and we descended to FL210. Lost a GEN, APU wouldn't start, declared emergency, diverted to JFK.

EGE- On visual approach, selecting the basic RWY 25 (instead of the LDA 25) then extending off the end of the runway provides some additional SA.

DFW - Hot brakes above 10K on the SID. Slowed, extended, cooled, slowed more, then retracted. Be sure to advise ATC you won't be at normal climb speed, they will turn you off the SID.

 
March 18, 2021

My first impression is that this program is far superior to anything we've done in the past. All three sim sessions were very relaxed and at such an easy pace. We were done early on each day and had time to request any maneuvers we might want to do. I never felt buried in spots like I have in the past, where they used to come so fast and there were so many that we were under a time crunch to fit them all in the session. I actually learned new things each night, to the point I felt I could absorb the information for later use. A huge amount of credit goes to my FO, who came completely prepared and backed me up whenever I was task saturated running ECAM non-normals.

I prepared like I always do by armchair flying each of the spots with special emphasis on actions and callouts associated with that spot. They really are looking for everyone to know their triggers and flows as well as actions and callouts.

Day 1, RTS:

All spots at JFK except for the final spot at SFO. The airplane was a through-flight with crew change, so it was powered up and all checklists were presumed accomplished when we got in.

Spot 1) Single-engine taxi. We pushed off of gate 41, tail west, started engine 1, and proceeded with a low-visibility single-engine taxi via TA, right on A to 22R at F. I had the FO start 2 as soon as we were established on A and we arrived at the intersection departure right at the 3 minute warm up.

Spot 2) Captain Low-vis takeoff to a CAT II on 13L with landing. No tricks or gotchas. After takeoff and somewhere short of final vectors, the instructor put us on position freeze to allow time for the setup and briefing. Remember to discuss threats, go-around considerations and all the required briefing items for CAT approaches on the OD pages. It's a CAT II, so you have to see something, and you will barely see something. It's supposed to be an autoland. Apparently some pilots see the runway and disconnect the autopilot. Leave it connected until the 60 kt callout.

Spot 3) Captain gusty wind takeoff, followed by an air conditioning non-normal and a VOR approach to 31L. The non-normal was no big deal, as I recall it was a Vent extract fault. The VOR approach has a 29º offset from the runway, with the added bonus of a strong left crosswind. Pace your turn to final so you don't blow through the centerline. Remember to brief the special engine failure procedure for this runway.

Spot 4) First Officer gets this takeoff, and you're going to lose an engine with your first chance to fly the plane! As soon as the gear came up, engine 2 failed with no remaining N1 or N2 rotation. After cleanup and assigning the pilot flying, I elected to treat the engine as damaged and we pressed the fire pushbutton and extinguisher per ECAM. On the next spot, I did it without pressing the fire pushbutton. That makes the ECAM a little disjointed, but it has the benefit of allowing the X-Bleed to remain open if you need to use the APU bleed for some reason. The instructor emphasized that either option was available, it comes down to a judgement call about the condition of that failed engine and how you want to treat it. In any case, this spot ends with the FO completing a hand-flown ILS to 31R to a landing. There is only one go-around on this RLE that is not self-induced. Remember to brief the engine-out missed approach procedure.

Spot 5) Captain takeoff with engine 2 failure at V1, followed by the hand-flown ILS 31R. Nothing remarkable here, but the sim instructor did show us a neat trick to pre-set the engine-out missed approach procedure. Page through the flight plan to the first blue item on the missed approach. Insert JFK11 on top of that point. Then enter JFK11/180/25 as the next point and enter it in the MCDU. Finally, press the overfly pushbutton and put that on top of the JFK11. Now, in the event of a single-engine miss, you'll have guidance for that turn. Just remember that it is a track and not a heading that is displayed on the ND and if you miss the approach, you'll have to set that 180 heading after you get the turn completed.

Spot 6) First Officer gusty wind takeoff, Electric non-normal and RNAV (RNP) Z 13R approach. After takeoff, we saw the electric page pop up with the flashing advisory for IDG 1 temperature. Before I could even get the QRH open to the advisory pages, the temperature was over 180º and we got the ECAM for IDG 1 overheat. Remember that it's a red-guarded pushbutton, so confirm and don't press for more than 3 seconds to avoid damage to the disconnect mechanism. Cleaned up the ECAM and the FO completed the approach. As always, remember to brief everything like you're in the airplane, not in the sim doing spot after spot. That means that we need to discuss threats, landing distance assessment, go-around considerations, etc., as well as complete the descent checklist for each approach. Pay attention to the fine print. This approach has an approach-category C-D driven max speed of 165 kts from ZEBAK to JONAT, as well as a missed approach speed limit of 210 kts.

Spot 7) First officer LOC 22R, go-around and landing. Nothing difficult here. Follow the OD pages and fly the approach and missed approach.

Spot 8) Both pilots fly the LDA 28R PRM approach with a breakout. This will set up all Airbus first officers to finally be authorized to fly PRM approaches once everyone has been trained. The breakout was a non-event turn off course at 1,500 feet. Maintain, altitude, stay in the Climb detent and reconfigure the aircraft when it's all done. We were not expected to brief the Attention All Users page associated with this approach. Just fly it, listen to the monitor frequency, and comply with the breakout instructions.

Day 2, MO:

This is what used to be called a maneuvers validation. Now it's a maneuvers observation with a check airman. Do everything right and you'll be out early, but it's a train-to-proficiency event, so if anything doesn't go as planned, there's plenty of time to re-do spots.

This day is split between MCO and DFW with a final high-terrain scenario at EGE.

Spot 1) Captain low-vis takeoff to a CAT III Dual MCO 36R approach and landing. Visibility for takeoff was 5/5/5 and it improved to 6/6/6 so we were legal for the approach. No SMGS chart available at MCO.

Spot 2) First officer low-vis (1600 RVR) rejected takeoff. Somewhere around 100 its we had a Thrust Reverser 1 unlocked. Stop the aircraft, parking brake, PA and what's the problem? No evacuation on this one and we repositioned for the same takeoff, followed by the MCO RNAV (GPS) 36L. A big emphasis item in this training is developing a thorough understanding of the approach naming conventions and how they fit into our SEL 8, 9 or 10 aircraft capabilities. An approach with AR or RNP in parentheses requires a 9 or 10 capable aircraft.

Spot 3) First officer takeoff with a second segment engine failure right after the gear is retracted. Just like yesterday, it will be a hand flown ILS, this time to MCO 36R with a single-engine go around. No engine out missed procedure published here, so it's just runway heading.

Spot 4) Captain gusty winds takeoff, hydraulic non-normal and MCO LOC 36R with a go-around. We bled out all the yellow hydraulic fluid after takeoff and got the ECAM for HYD Y RSVR LO LVL. Completed the procedures, set up and briefed the approach, but no runway in sight at minimums. Go around followed by the same approach with improved visibility and landing. No nosewheel steering, so it gets a little squirrelly as you slow down, but manageable. The check airman wanted me to see that you can actually clear the runway, even without nosewheel steering, so we did that using differential thrust and brakes.

Spot 5) Captain V1 cut, single engine hand-flown ILS to MCO 36R. Unremarkable.

Spot 6) DFW-EGE, doesn't matter who flies. I think it was the HUDAD 2 RNAV departure off of 18L, the specifics don't really matter. It's just an exercise to begin the SID before you get a door non-normal. Ours was DOOR AFT CARGO. There's a QRH follow up to check pressurization and you continue if pressure is normal. Simple.

Spot 7) FO crosswind takeoff fro DFW 18L with a brakes non-normal. We got the expected BRAKES HOT ECAM, notified ATC that we couldn't comply with the speeds on the departure, assured that we were below 250 kts and extended the gear, slowed to below 220 kts as they cooled, then verified we were still below 220 kts to retract. This was followed by a captain flown RNAV (RNP) Z 13R in visual conditions with a tower-directed go-around. Pay attention to the fine print on the missed approach, there's a 185 kt speed restriction to keep you clear of converging traffic on the 18 approaches. The MCDU had the 185 kt built in, but the FMGC didn't honor it, so intervene and set a selected speed below 185.

Spot 8) DFW 18L visual approach. Doesn't matter who flies, I think it was the FO on this one. It's kind of a contrived scenario to overspeed the flaps. Everything was smooth and normal until all of a sudden, the airspeed rapidly increased into the red. It was pretty lame, but the takeaway is that they want us to be uber aware of airspeed and err on the cautious side with flap extension speeds.

Spot 9) EGE LDA 25 visual approach. Anybody can fly it or both can try it. It results in a go-around for traffic. There's a special VFR pattern that you have to build some points for in the Fix Info pages, then you just manually fly the circuit and set up a 700-800 fpm descent to landing after you pass the EG25D point. You'll cross a ridge and fly down a valley that basically forms a 45º dogleg to final. I found the Track/FPA presentation helpful. As others have pointed out, you'll be operating there with no control tower, so the PM is expected to make standard CTAF calls.

Day 3, RLE and RAD

We had scenario 15-4, DCA-BOS. There's a couple of issues with the flight docs that are included in the training manual. We were supposed to have a CDL for a missing static wick, but the flight plan had the MEL for the APU generator instead. The check airman said to ignore that and go with the CDL depicted in the briefing slides. Not a big deal for the non-normal that we got later in the flight. The weather on flight documents was different that the ATIS printouts we got in the sim. It was 3/4 mile vis, so I elected to do a two-engine taxi so the FO and I could both have our attention outside where it belongs. Straightforward taxi to RWY 1 via J and hold short of 4. All lights on for the crossing. Remember to thoroughly brief the P56 avoidance area, as well as engine out considerations. Check NAV in blue before pushback and again before taking the runway, then verify NAV green by 200 on departure. I find it helpful to write a note on the departure chart to remind me, just incase some distraction pops up on the taxi out. Departure was uneventful. Climbing out of 180 we were advised that there was moderate turbulence from FL220-360. We asked for FL200 and it was approved. I called the FA's anyway, and of course we still encountered the moderate turbulence right after that. Know your standard turbulence procedures. It didn't last long, and we were out of it and got the seatbelt sign off. I sent a message to dispatch to let them know that our altitude was more than 4,000 from planned and to give a turbulence PIREP. The sim doesn't have the capability of uplinking new fuel burn numbers, but the check airman faked it for us anyway. They do a good job of keeping things busy with frequency changes and direct clearances. We got the approach briefed and were nearing TOD when we got the ECAM for AIR ENG 1 BLEED LEAK. Not much to do here, except to avoid icing conditions. I asked ATC about reports and they had none. Then I used the Dispatch Direct VHF network frequency for the New York-Boston area and checked with dispatch. They also had no icing reports and concurred that continuing to BOS was the best plan. I checked the ECAM supplemental and noted that our ENG 1 bleed valve was properly closed and the temperature had fallen below the trigger point, so I was not concerned about temps inside the nacelle and we proceeded to BOS. The weather had deteriorated and the expected Light Visual (RNV-F) to 33L had been replaced by the ILS 33L. After landing, we taxied clear of the runway and took a break before beginning the RAD portion.

RAD: All spots at LAS

Spot 1) Captain takeoff with unreliable airspeed at around 8,000 feet. First officer showed me at around 280 knots and my PFD and the STBY showed 250. Followed the procedure for setting pitch at 10º and climb thrust since we were above acceleration altitude and below 10,000 ft. Terrain wasn't immediately and issue, so I leveled at 8,500. Our sim had the BUSS pushbuttons, so it was a pretty quick process to get the airplane stabilized.

Spot 2) First officer takeoff with predictive windshear. We talked about the considerations on the runway, turned on ignition, elected to use TOGA and began the takeoff roll. At about the point that the predictive windshear advisory displayed on the ND, I went brain dead and rejected the takeoff. Reminder, that for advisories, we continue the takeoff and turn away from the windshear depiction. The check airman was gracious and didn't fault me for my overly conservative rejected takeoff, and it was a good chance to discuss the requirement to return to the gate for a maintenance write-up for any rejected takeoff over 80 kts. We did the takeoff again and as soon as we were airborne, turned south to avoid the weather. After repositioning, it was my turn for a reactive windshear escape on approach. I left the autopilot on until 200 feet on the approach, and as soon as I disconnected it, we were in the shear. Follow the escape procedure and have fun!


Spot 3) First officer hand-flown SID with autothrust off. Non event, followed by a surprise upset recovery once the autopilot had been re-engaged.

Spot4) We went up to FL380 and both had a chance to do some slow flight, with an emphasis on how little engine thrust is available up there if you get behind the curve. This was followed by the high altitude stall for each of us. Then a couple of upset recovery maneuvers.

Spot 5) Captain hand-flown STAR with no autothrust. Easy.

Spot 6) Captain flown visual approach to 26L with a capture of the glideslope from above. Just be ready to arm the approach, dial the altitude up and set v/s between -1,500 and -1,800 as soon as the sim comes off freeze. We did the go-around off of this, then had plenty of time to play around with any other scenarios we wanted to go over. I was really impressed by the program this year, as well as all of the instructors/check airmen!

 
March 18, 2021

Finished RLE today. Update comply 360 they fixed the mel/cdl. Now the CDL one static discharge is in the flight plan. I took a picture of it and briefed it that were good to go with one missing. We did RLE 15-6 DCA to BOS. Climbed to FL270 got mod turbulence descent to FL210. Then immediately got elec idg 1 oil ovht. Apu would not start. Divert to JFK. ILS to 13L, event over. During brief cka said the tps questions in the brief is our limitations questions. We have the answers to the tps questions in the brief so study those and you will be good. One walk around question per person. No problem. All procedures and ecams were as previous briefed. RAD was as advertised.

 
March 15, 2021

Just finished up new CQT (RGS,RTS, MO, RLE). Can't add much to the previous March 14th review - spot on! Some exceptions/differences tho:

RGS - uneventful, but helpful to view the slides (for all training) in <Training & Qual, Continuing Qual (Recurrent), CQ Presentation and Briefing, Gnd and Sim. As usual, very little systems review, but rather the slides show the scenario based training per system. Great instructor, but of course ran out of time.

MO - Spot 6 - DFW door ECAM, be sure to use all resources - ask FA's and I called Dispatch/Mx to see if they would prefer handling write-up in DFW rather than KEGE!
Spot 7 - RNAV (RNP) Z 13R - just pointed out that the RF legs are in the MA. Don't recall missing tho?
Spot 10 - Spot is mostly for uncontrolled radio work. We elected not to "Go Around", no need to re-string approach and had briefed the 10-7B-5 Visual Pattern RWY 25. We just leveled off at 8500', retracted flaps to 3 and stayed at 155kts. Instructor advised to just leave gear and drive around to stay in close for terrain. Think I'd rather retract gear and still drive around on flaps 3. Then gear/dn, flaps full at EG25D and a 7-800'/m descent worked fine. Be sure to cancel flight plan - ask controller if freq avail on gnd, or call Dispatch on gnd.

RLE - We had (and advised day before) 15-5 (DCA-BOS). Pulled up paperwork the night before. MEL was APU Gen Inop, but was advised to disregard that (Instructor got an email to change scenario). ATC advised us about mod turb from FL220-330 - we were filed for 270, so after checking fuel (plenty) requested final of FL 210. About 170K' in the climb, received mod CAT for short duration - called back to check on F/A's and all was fine so continued (smooth). Also had ELEC IDG 1 Oil OVHT, but APU OK, so notified Mx thru ACARS and continued to BOS. Descent on ROBUC arrival and eventually cleared direct to LYHTT for Light Visual (RNV F) 33L. Be sure to set in 269' (250 + field elev) in Baro and be at 1800' and configured by LYHTT for a tight turn. Received ATC instructions to G/A (traffic on rwy I think), so Soft Go to vectors for a Visual 33L - had F/O dial in and brief ILS as a backup.
RADs - all training, so all very good.


 
March 14, 2021

Trip Report on CQT/RQES

Just completed RQES (short requal) in CLT, which is exactly like the new (Mar 2021) CQT, with the addition of one extra day for an IPT. Overall comment is that four days of training is a long time to be there, and the first two sims are jammed packed with events, so show up rested and semi-studied up (it is a 'come as you are' party since you have limited time/energy between sims to do any extra prep). Also, another 'global' comment (BTW don't say 'global' in the training center anymore, it's 'identify the problem' using the FIX strategy), is that they are still hashing out a lot of details of the new syllabus, so your experience may be somewhat different as they work out the kinks. With so many other changes, they left the majority of RTS unchanged from 2020, the first half of MO (maneuvers observation) equals "RVA 2020" plus five additional SPOTs, and most changes are found in the RAD. Know your triggers, flows, callouts, and FIX strategy/procedures and you have the 90 percent solution. Also, say "my aircraft" and "ECAM actions complete" every five minutes or so and you should be fine. In general, when we worked a non-normal and got to the status page, we chose to continue until we got to "Clear Status", said "ECAM actions complete", then did our follow ups. Also, I know you've heard it a thousand times before, but if you make a mistake, put it behind you and press on (these are SPOTs, unrelated to one another). For you RQES guys, the IPT was a great substitute for 'coming in early' and practicing in the mockup. IPT was a non-event, where we practiced flows, loading the box, did a short flight, and practiced one ECAM and one go around (big help). If you get into ETHOS (username is AA plus your employee number, and you can use 'forgot password' to reset the PW), there is a great functional FMS trainer if you have been out awhile.

Day one-Academics. All of our academics were in room 162 (the auditorium). They were cracking down on masks, but also we were given the choice of pulling them down if we needed to. Food is semi-limited in the training center, but the vending machines are fully stocked (and the coffee machines work in general). Cafeteria is open on weekdays. Recommend doing the ETHOS systems modules for the ones that will be covered and looking at the classroom slideshows before going to training (they are a little more situational). Distance Learning modules, at least for my quarter, were "no value added" for anything you'll face in training (however, if you're RQES you are supposed to have the DL completed prior to arrival, even if there is time left in the quarter). Joint Crew Training was accomplished with no FAs, and finished with you throwing three punches on the dummy. There is no FMB block (not FAA required) so FMB instruction boils down to 4 iPad questions which you probably already have done (classroom links in with their iPads to answer). For RGS (systems), you get 3:15 hours, and when we hit the end of that time, we truncated the rest of the training (didn't get to all the systems). However, managed to cover the system malfunctions that you will see in the sim so that was good. Went down and did the door trainer at the end of RGS (all demo). No emergency equipment training. RHF (human factors) as always is a good class. For Disrupting Everyday Bias, if you've done it in the past year (the new one more tailored to pilots), then you don't have to do it again (our instructor had a list, and about half the class got to skate). Not a fan of this block of training, but it is not as 'in your face' as it once was.

RTS.

Briefing. All of the instructors/CKA had positive attitudes and wanted us to succeed. We had a sim instructor for RTS. Things are still getting fleshed out on these profiles, and during the brief someone even stuck their head in the door to inform us to "add an RNAV to the CA's workload". Slides are all located online on the aapilot's training home. Right before we stepped to the sim, the instructor mixed the SPOTs around a little, so that we would both get normal patterns out of the way before doing any of the funny patterns (I think he did this because we were both short requal guys). The training guide RTS Summary page says the sim only takes 2:30, but we used 4:05 of our 2:30-sim is packed!

All RTS SPOTs flown at KJFK. Weather is 800/3 unless otherwise noted. We wore our masks from briefing, thru the sim, thru debriefing. We were in SIM #2, which has CFMs and the old displays.

SPOT 1: Single Engine Taxi. Yes, this is actually a big enough deal to have its own SPOT. Started at gate 41 Concourse C (20-9D). No tricks, they just want to see you go out on one engine (remember to turn on the Yellow Electric Pump, and to turn it off just prior to starting #2). Taxi instructions were to RWY 22R, exit ramp on TWY TA, right on A, hold short rwy 22R on F. It is a low vis taxi, but the new graphics are good. Taxi route happens fairly quickly, so we started #2 once we got on A. During this drill, did all normal taxi checks, no surprises like other aircraft in the way, or ECAMS.

SPOT 2: Low Vis T/O, CAT II Autoland (CA) and Landing. Weather for T/O 1600 RVR. We shot the ILS CAT II Rwy 13L (21-3). Everything normal around the pattern. Remember on final, the FO stays inside on instruments, while the CA looks outside. On a Cat II, set the RA in the RA field (its 150'); this is a decision height, so you have to see something to actually land (and it has to be an Autoland). Of note, there are no visual callouts on CAT II/III approaches for the FO. Used the "three Bs" to do everything ("Boxes, blue pages, briefing"). Special emphasis this time on briefing what type of go around you would do. Approach and landing were uneventful, stopped straight ahead. I think you get a vanilla approach at first just to get the jitters out.

SPOT 3: (CA) T/O with Gusts, VENT EXTRACT FAULT, VOR 31L Appr, Landing w/Gusts. The VENT EXTRACT FAULT is an ECAM procedures drill/FIX strategy drill. Remember to do an ECAM verification (used to call it a 'global check') - the CAB PRESS panel will be displayed on the lower ECAM with an amber outlet valve, plus the Fault light in the Extract switch. When you push the Extract button on the Ventilation panel (it will have a fault light in it), the ECAM goes away, and the exercise is essentially over. CA flew the VOR approach (don't sweat it, it's just like flying an RNAV except you toggle the VOR on and force feed the VOR frequency on the RAD/NAV page on the FMS). Several things that make the VOR final sporty: the final approach course is 29 degrees off to the left from runway heading, you have an overshooting wind, and there is a displaced threshold. Our plan was to go, once we broke out, to "AP off, FDs off, give me the bird (FPV)". In reality, we did all that, however the FPV never really comes into your crosscheck and is unnecessary. Once you maneuver to roll out on final, just "forget" everything that happened to get you to that position (ref. it is sporty) and fly the rest of the approach visually (you will have PAPIs and the "Brick" to help with glidepath maintenance).

SPOT 4: (FO) Engine Failure (Second Segment), SE CAT I ILS 31R. Went pretty much by the book. Delayed TOGA thrust until after AP engagement. Also, declared "Mayday", and flew a box pattern. Hand flew SE final from a dog leg. 5 degrees rudder trim into the good engine is a good WAG.

SPOT 5: (CA) Engine Failure with Fire (Between V1 and V2), SE CAT I ILS 31R Appr and Landing. Engine fire around V2. When it was time to designate PF, CKA asked us to keep the CA as PF, so the FO would have a chance to work an ECAM. There's a lot to think about, so here's just a few points: for initial pitch, set the box on the 10 degree line and let go of the pressure on the stick, because when go from ground to flight mode shortly after takeoff, it goes from demanding an elevator position to a rate, and then you can get into a vertical PIO. As well, if the engine that is on fire is still producing normal thrust, you should do a normal cleanup vs. the "level at 1000 feet" drill (somehow I've managed to miss this nuance all these years, but it's in the book, OM Vol I 2d.8.3 Engine Fire). In our situation, the engine conked out pretty quick. Hand flown SE pattern to a full stop.

SPOT 6: (CA & FO) Gusty Crosswind Takeoff, Elec Non-normal, RNAV (RNP) 13R Appr, Gusty Crosswind Landing. We got an "ELEC IDG 1 OVRHT" ECAM on climbout. This is a confirm item (red guarded switch). See RLE below (had same ECAM with the exception that the APU would not start). Started the APU and continued on (if you get two electrical supplies up, you can press on with your flight). Inside the final approach fix, told to go around prior to ZEBAK; speed is the name of the game, and since our mins were for both category C and D, our max speed was 165 knots on the go on the RF leg (CA briefed 155 knots for a buffer). Next speed is 210 max at TIHWO (in the MISSED APCH text on the plate). Came back around and landed uneventfully. Set up again outside of ASALT, and FO flew an uneventful approach to a full stop.

SPOT 7: (FO) LOC Approach 22R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing. When selecting the approach in the FMS, make sure you select the LOC and not the ILS (they are both in there-the LOC is the only one that will give you step down fixes and possibly a lower minimum). Also, bottom of the approach is a DDA, so add 50' to the MDA ("Must Do Arithmetic"). Set a 1NM ring around MATTR using the Fix Info page (1L on the FPLAN page) and used the front edge to both make sure our level off hockey stick was outside of this ring, and to remind us to pull the FPA knob. Also used the far side of the 1NM ring as a reminder to set the missed approach altitude (more on that later). FO began approach, and things were going great until we didn't break out. Did a soft go around, and realized we still had 1900' set in the FCU, not 4000' go around altitude. Caught that pretty quick, got reset on final, and had an uneventful landing.

SPOT 8: (CA and FO) KSFO LDA PRM 28R PRM APPROACH AND BREAKOUT. The point of this drill is that by the end of the year, FOs will be able to fly PRMs (currently only CAs are certified to do them). Also, the emphasis is on descending breakouts. Make sure you review the text page that comes right before the plate in Jepp. CA went first, and somewhere after GOBEC, told to "breakout and turn right to 330, descend to 1200" (or something like that). It is an "autopilot off" maneuver, leave FDs on unless you get an RA, which we did not. The FO set and selected the heading, and as per procedure, set but did not select altitude (that would put you in an idle descent). Once you get to altitude, then select it. Don't use any automation until you have reached both your heading AND altitude. Accelerated to 210, pulled up the gear and went to flaps 2. Repositioned and the FO did the same drill, with the exception that the CA DID pull the altitude, which is our normal habit pattern, so lesson learned. SPOT over.

MO (Maneuvers Observation).

The first five SPOTs of the MO are basically the old RVA from last training cycle's R18. The second five SPOTs are all new. MO is a 'train to standards' with the caveat that you have to do it within the allotted sim time. We had a CKA for our MO. Briefing was done directly from the slides, and first time around for our CKA. Took just over three hours to complete.

All SPOTs started on the runway, checks considered done. SPOTs were accomplished in the exact order they are listed in the simulator guide (no surprises). We were in sim #4, enhanced 320 with IAEs that is full up w/respect to things like auto-call outs on all approaches. Unless otherwise noted, used FLAPS 3 and Autobrakes MED for all approaches.

SPOT 1: (CA) Low Vis Takeoff, KMCO CAT III 36R Approach, Landing. Given weather as "5/5/5", so had to determine if we needed a takeoff alternate (you do, but here's how you get there): 1) look on "back" of taxi chart (20-9A) to determine if you are even LEGAL to takeoff (you need minimum 5/5/5 to launch on all runways, so you are good), 2) Look at chart on page OD-8 in QRH to determine what reports and facilities are needed to takeoff (everything works, so good there), 3) same page tells you when you need an alternate-look at CAT III mins for RWY 36R (21-6) and see that you are below the 6/6/6 needed to land (plus you are below max landing wt), so BAM you need a takeoff alternate. We were told TPA was 1000/3 so that became our T/O alternate. Simple departure clearance (runway heading to 5000). We got a couple of turns to downwind, then were repositioned and frozen on a dogleg to final. Did all the appropriate briefs, checklists, etc, and shot an uneventful Autoland to a full stop straight ahead (chose full flaps for improved view). Only comment was "announce Autopilot-Off, THEN select autopilot off" so I felt like we must have done good if that was it.

SPOT 2: (FO) Low Vis RTO, Low Vis T/O, KMCO RNAV (GPS) 36L Approach, Landing. We blew a jug around 100 kts and rejected the takeoff. Remember, this is one of two times you are REQUIRED to make the "This is the captain-remain seated, remain seated, remain seated" PAs, the other being when you brief T.E.S.T. anticipating an evacuation, and one is NOT required (OD-37 bullet f). On the second attempt, we took off and did a box pattern back to the runway. The approach and landing were uneventful.

SPOT 3: (FO) Engine Failure 2nd Segment Climb, hand flown SE to a missed KMCO CAT I ILS 36R, Landing. Engine failure occurred after V2 with gear coming up. On SE approach, went around due to fog bank rolling in. Remember on the SE go, you are back in the 'trim the rudder' before AP will reengage (8-10 seconds rudder trim works pretty well, into the good engine). Discussed the new methodology of flying ground track on the go vs. runway heading (basically putting a heading correction into the wind in, using the FCU, so now when you hit green dot speed, you are effectively doing FOUR pulls-ALT, HDG, SPD, MCT. Runway heading was 005 degrees, winds were from the west, so we arbitrarily put in 355 degrees (ten degrees into the wind), and that seemed to work good enough. FO deselected the AP on a dog leg with flaps 2, so you get to do some configuring while in manual flight. Landing was uneventful. Just in case you haven't thought about it in a while, here are a couple of SE approach and landing tips (SIM ONLY): for course/glidepath control, keep the FD bars centered in the pitch box, forming a plus sign. When you need a correction, treat your side stick as a 'thruster', and just tap it towards the correction gently and wait (your primary focus is this box). When the runway comes into view, lookout briefly, announce "landing", then come back inside and stay on the box. When the RA announces "50" go back outside and land (if you look outside too early tendency is to level off and you are potentially going around). Don't try to make your corrections off of raw data in the sim, especially if you have good FDs.

SPOT 4: (CA) T/O with Gusts, Hydraulic Failure, KMCO LOC 36R, Go Around/Missed Approach, Landing. Our HYD failure was HYD Y RSVR OVHT (I think but honestly can't remember). The big takeaway is how to do the Landing App procedure (in the past, have done this in the briefing, but this time actually accomplished it in the simulator). I don't have much else to contribute, so I will cover this in detail: Open the Landing App, and follow these steps: 1) reset the app (button is on second to bottom line), 1A) Select non-normal at the bottom of the page, 2) Select your aircraft (all CLT sims are 320s, and sim #4 is IAEs), 3) Select your failure (try to match your ECAM-for us, went under HYD, and selected Y SYS LO PR), 4) one reverser, 5) CG greater than 25%, 6) No wind correction as all SPOTS have an exact crosswind, 7) ***Use FMGC VREF (toggled on); go to PERF page for approach, and while FULL flaps selected, note the VLS (which in this world equals FMGC VREF), and enter it in the Land App directly below the "Use FMGC VREF" toggle. This will generate a VAPP in the lower left corner of the app; enter this number in ACARS in the lower left corner of the PERF APPR page, and THEN select Flaps-THREE for this emergency***, 8) note your landing distance, and compare this to the back of the taxi page (KMCO 20-9A) and look in the "USABLE LENGTHS-LANDING BEYOND" double column for your runway, in the left "Threshold" column, the only one that really means anything to us anymore (I believe this further leads you to a ball note for a usable length greater than 11K, obviously longer than the 5152 feet from the landing app). During the actual LOC approach, we made a 1NM radius around JAKOR; the front edge of the radius is to remind you to start down at .3NM, and the far edge of the radius is to remind you to set missed approach altitude. You can also use the radius to see how you are doing with your level off (where the hockey stick is depicted).

SPOT 5: (CA) Engine Failure at V1, SE KMCO Cat I ILS 36R Landing. Uneventful. Engine failure was associated with a fire, and loss of thrust. Can't remember which SPOT it was on, but when it was time to assign pilot flying, CKA asked that the CA continue flying so that the FO could work a non-normal.

SPOT 6: (Either) KDFW-KEGE Departure, SID, Door Non-Normal. Normal takeoff out of DFW, climbing out on SID, slow to develop. Somewhere around 6K got the DOOR AFT (BULK) CARGO ECAM. FO asked to level off, but we were denied by the CKA. No matter what door you end up getting, you end up on QRH 7-1, which basically says if your cabin pressure is normal (which it is), there is "no crew action required". The point of the exercise is that folks have not been continuing on to the destination when the essentially have a sensor issue (door is locked, micro switch is the real fault). Training center guidance is that, with normal cabin pressure, continue on to the destination. I asked if anyone was going to back me if the door indeed came off (more likely just depressurize) and was told again the book answer is to continue the flight.

SPOT 7: KDFW RNAV (RNP) Z RWY 13R APPROACH, MISSED APPROACH. This one is a blur, so I'm assuming it was uneventful.

SPOT 8: KDFW 18L Crosswind Takeoff, Departure, Brakes Non-Normal. After takeoff, and around 7K got hot brakes. The entire point of this drill is to have a plan to NOT overspeed the gear. You can lower the gear at 250 max, fly around with it hanging at 280 max, and retract it at 220 max (the big gotcha). We chose to slow to 210 kts, let the gear cool, then after raising it accelerate to normal speed. Remember that the "Check Speed" callout also applies to the gear, so PM, back up the PF.

SPOT 9: (Either) KDFW 18L Visual Approach, Gusty Winds. We did a visual approach. It was to 18L. Plenty of info on this in the slide shows, basically use all instrument tools available (ILS, RNAV, etc) to back up your visual approach, and stay above the TCA floor. Emphasized using the 3 to 1 rule to avoid busting the bottom of the TCA.

SPOT 10: (Either) KEGE LDA 25 Visual Approach to Uncontrolled Field, Go Around, Visual Pattern and Landing. This is basically a terrain awareness exercise, as well as how to make radio calls on CTAF at an uncontrolled airfield. We did not get too deep into the details of getting in and out of Eagle. One point is that you are instructed to, in the event of a missed approach, fly the EO MA (10-7E-4), even if you have two good engines (the reasoning is that if you are on the normal MA ground track and lose an engine, you may not be able to maintain terrain clearance). We started around VOAXA, partially configured, and there was a Cessna on the ground making calls that he was preparing for takeoff. As we got closer to the field, fully configured, it was obvious the Cessna was not going to initiate their takeoff roll, so initiated a soft go around. Following Visual Pattern guidance (10-7B-5) we leveled off at 8500 approaching CIPKU, and made a left-hand pattern, aiming at EG25D (set on the Fix Info page), which is basically the "perch" point (for configuration, raised flaps to 2 and raised the gear during the go), reconfigured approaching the perch, then flew a 'final turn' and landed uneventfully on Rwy 25. One issue we had was with speed; because we did a go around, we would have to activate and confirm again to get managed speed (among other things); did not figure this out at first so decided to just fly a selected speed that made sense. Halfway thru the final turn, the CKA told the PM to give the PF managed speed (activate and confirm). A 'sim'-ism was that at 8500' on downwind, you only cleared the terrain by 400' at one point (CKA thought it was a terrain modeling issue in the sim). MO over.

RLE.

For our RLE, we did 15-6, which was DCA to BOS. Our non-normal was ELEC IDG 1 OIL OVHT, APU no start, divert into JFK because one generator=AMBER LAND ASAP (land at nearest suitable field).

Briefing. CKA was a great guy, wanted us to succeed. He put us at ease and informed us that it was his first check sim with the new syllabus. Briefing slides are available online (aapilots.aa.com> Training and Quals> Training Home>Big Dukin "12 Month CQT" Button>Study Materials>Presentations>CQ Line Operational Evaluation (RLE/RAD). I only point out the link, because currently you can drill down in the Training Home page and end up on last year's slides, so check the date on the slides (should be on or after 28 Feb 2021). Brief was mostly instructional, with a few softball questions thrown in. For Systems Validation, we did a few of the slides in the "Walk Around" presentation (found online), and also a few questions from a bank of six Systems Validation questions, all about TPS stuff (could not find this slideshow online anywhere). Our questions (while looking at parts of a TPS): "your closeout weight is 140.5; are you legal?" The answer is NO, because your weight is above ATOW, and you are doing a standard thrust takeoff (get another TPS). "Your TOW is 131.0; are you legal?" The answer is YES, because now we are allowed to go 2K pounds above PTOW on a TOGA takeoff. "Can you takeoff at 5 degrees?" Yes, since you can look at the TPS and it gives you numbers for both 4 and 6 degrees. We were also given one more situation, where we had an unplanned tailwind, and the question was "can you do a FLEX?" The answer was "No-TOGA only", and the stipulation was we could not request another TPS (did not really get all of that one and I'm on my third Weller). FO had a jingle for some of the TPS: "if I PLAN a TOGA party, ASSUME I'm going to FLEX", meaning use PTOW for TOGA and ATOW for FLEX (hey, gouge is gouge, right?). Final 'gouge' - I overheard someone saying that if given the choice, pick questions one and two, as three thru six are a lot more involved with 'math in public'. I was a little stressed about the TPS stuff, but the answer to almost everything is "request another TPS".

NOTE: There are 6 scenarios, 15-1 thru 15-6; the first three are BOS to DCA, and use the same release, found in your training guide. The last three are DCA to BOS, and also share a release. Airbusdriver.net has a good listing of what to expect for each.

Sim itself has no intentional curveballs. We were in Sim #4 (IAEs). We started out on gate 42 in DCA, not the first flight of the day for the plane, but our first flight of the day. Did not use headsets, however, did set the radios like on a real flight. Got wrapped around the axle pretty quick because the release had an MEL'ed APU generator, but that was not part of the scenario (jet was supposed to be missing a single static discharger). This was part of the 'growing pains' of all the changes, and our CKA told us to disregard it. The static discharger is 23-01 in the CDL; if you look it up it says you can go with one missing. Ground ops in DCA were uneventful. Taking off to the north, weather was low-we had determined in the brief how to decide if you need a takeoff alternate, and already had JFK listed as one on the release so no discussion there. Remember to do the mandatory briefings for DCA (Co pages 10-7C-1 and also should brief 10-7C-2, 10-7C-4, 10-7E-2), insert the EO T/O procedure in the SEC FLT PLN (OD-34 tells you how to do it). When briefing the FAs, remember that it is now required to brief them on turbulence procedures (FOM HOME>Fast Reference Links>Turbulence>"XXX Turbulence Flight Crew Actions", FOM 3c.4.2 "FA Briefing", FOM 1c.6.2 "Non-Routine PA Examples" has two you should know from memory for "In Progress or Imminent/No Warning" ("Flight attendants be seated immediately") and "Limited Warning" ("Flight attendants stow the carts and take your seats"). Decided to taxi out on two engines (gave the reasons that it was a relatively short taxi, congested in DCA, hadn't flown in six months, had a rock in my shoe, etc.). Taxied to 01, and was cleared on to the runway, and made our first real boof of the flight, as we took what I think was TWY E onto the runway (should have continued on J); coordinated to back-taxi, got to practice a 180, and took off (Flaps 1, 117,000 lbs, FLEX takeoff). Uneventful in the climb, got several "directs'. From about 20K to 27K (our level off), it was a turbulence drill, so got to go thru "light turbulence procedures in effect", to "Flight Attendants be seated immediately" to "Moderate turbulence procedures in effect". With all that going on, remember after you level off, do an A-HEFOE check at some point in cruise. Right after level off, got an Advisory for IDG Oil Temp, followed by the ECAM for "ELEC IDG 1 OIL OVHT" and did the non-normal methodology drill (remember to first state "My Aircraft"). You will disconnect the IDG- it is a CONFIRM item (red guarded switch). About all I can add to this is have a plan on how you are going to know that the IDG is disconnected (you can only hold the switch for 3 seconds max without risking damage and don't want to use that particular 3 seconds to figure out where to look for disconnect confirmation!). On the ELEC ECAM page, in the lower left below the GEN 1 box is "IDG 1 160 C" or whatever the temp is (I think a high temp is in amber). When the IDG is disconnected, the word "DISC" shows up under IDG 1 (mine actually did not show up until I RELEASED the button at three seconds). We elected to do the STATUS page when we first arrived on it, and after "ECAM Actions Complete" went to the new QRH. There is a follow up on 9-11, which basically tells you to start the APU. Our APU did an Auto shut down (remember, this is a new ECAM so new NNM drill). The APU follow-up is basically go to the ETOPS pages. Since you only have one AC generator (engine or APU), you are "LAND ASAP" (displayed in amber). We declared "Pan Pan Pan Pan Pan Pan" and I ran almost everything else from the "Non-Routine Landing Considerations" (OD-36) pages. "Used" the Crew Phone to call company and coordinate a divert. We were 40 miles south of JFK at 27K when we decided to divert, and I picked BDL as a divert, since I figured it would take us that long to get down and do everything else (actually pre-disposed to BDL because was listed here on airbusdriver.net as the place to go, so temper your decision here with your actual situation!). JFK was the better choice, and the CKA 'helped' me by making BDL wx significantly worse than JFK (debriefed in the context of what does "nearest suitable field" mean to me, and JFK definitely fit the definition better!). We asked for a present position hold to get our collective feces in one sock, got vectors to the ILS RWY 13L (weather was reasonable), and stopped straight ahead on the runway (CKA request). Discussed a few items, such as when do you have 121.5 in VHF 2 ("whenever radio availability permits"-FOM 7c.4.6). LOFT was over and we took a break.

RAD

SPOT 1: CA Unreliable Airspeed. Flew the Cowboy 8 out of KLAS. Flew manually on the SID. After ROPER, was told to reengage the automation, and going thru around 9K, the FO noticed his airspeed increasing dramatically. "My Aircraft", then leveled off at 10K. Run as a non-normal. The actual ECAM you get is something like NAV ADR Disagree, so not obvious at first that you may have an unreliable airspeed problem. Make sure you coordinate with departure (declare MAYDAY and ask for a safe altitude for terrain clearance and a vector (basically got 10K and a downwind heading). This is a quick action, so FO goes to #6 on the QRC, and works the procedure. AP off, A/THR off, FD off, then (technique) turned the FPV on (this was great for holding level flight and still worked). Used the following gouge for a "first guess" at thrust setting: 60% at 10K, 70% at 20K, 80% at 30K. Sim 4 has the BUSS, so we played around with that for a while (gouge with that is that during your approach configuration, as the speed gets to the low end of the green band (and into the yellow), it's time to make the next configuration). When you go to the new QRH (pg. 16-3), and start busting thru the charts, make sure you read the table headers and choose the correct one for your aircraft type, engine type, configuration. We set the initial pitch and thrust and looked at our three AS indicators-the standby was the closest to what the chart said we should be doing, so we decided ADR 3 was still working properly. NOTE: ADRS are laid out on the panel in the order "1-3-2", so ensure you are shutting off the correct ones!

SPOT 2: Windshear on T/O and Approach KLAS-FO on Takeoff prior to V1 26R, CA on Approach 26L. This was the best windshear training session I think I have ever had, and the biggest takeaway is having some sort of caveman plan on how you are going to respond to different windshear stimuli. For example, the ONLY time you are ever required to perform the windshear escape maneuver is when you get "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" reactive guidance inflight; if you hear that, "Escape, TOGA, My Aircraft". Also, if you get a Caution or Warning from the predictive windshear system during takeoff and below V1, REJECT (if it is talking to you during the takeoff, REJECT-don't reject for an Advisory which doesn't "talk"-check thrust to TOGA and continue the takeoff). The predictive system goes "silent" at 100 kts, so if its talking you are most likely below V1. In our scenario, the FO was performing the takeoff, and around 80 kts got "Windshear Ahead"; the CA performed a reject (new weather graphics were pretty cool in sim 4). Another note on takeoff: if you are going to continue, guidance says rotate NLT 2000' remaining-a good visual cue for 2000' remaining is that the edge lights turn amber. Yet another note: told that besides ensuring you are slowing down, the '80' and '60' calls are there to help insure the CA stows the reversers during a reject (because it may lead to an evacuation and you don't want them out with peeps going outside). On approach, if it says "Go Around-Windshear Ahead" perform a normal GA and steer away from the depicted windshear, and if gets into the "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" then do the escape maneuver. The CA shot the ILS to 26L, and at around 400' got "WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR WINDSHEAR" and executed the escape maneuver. Very eye opening, as the A/C bounced around a lot, and it took full aft stick to keep it from hitting the ground (got down to 40' RA). On a side note, we set up for windshear and several other EPs that did not "insert' themselves (i.e., no windshear ever materialized on first try); we were told this is b/c they're just loading more stuff into the sim computers than they were ever designed to handle.

SPOT 3: KLAS 26R Takeoff/SID/Upset Recovery (FO), Slow Flight, Full Stall. FO performed a hand flown Cowboy 8 departure. Passing ROPER, the FO selected full automation. During the climbout we were warned of a heavy that was four miles in front of us. The FO was given a DIR TO, and while heads down, went into an upset. Recovery was uneventful (remember to be smooth as there are peeps in the back). We were repositioned to 38K, and the CA went first (dealers choice) for hand-flown slow flight. Did a thrust demo, moving the levers from CLIMB to MCT then TOGA, and noticing that EPR and N1 did not move much at all, as well as you just didn't feel anything happening. Took turns flying around, where the PM would dial in a new heading for the PF-just did a couple of turns. Next, FO went first for the full stall; CKA put us in alternate law, and after pulling the thrust levers back to idle, instructed us to hold 38K until we got the "STALL STALL" aural warning. The most important thing for breaking the stall is to reduce the AOA, so push the stick forward (takes a lot), while simultaneously bring the thrust levers up to about halfway to CLIMB. As A/S increases above VLS, start to smoothly add back pressure (don't pull it into a secondary stall as pitch and roll are highly sensitive at high altitude), and smoothly add power back in. Continue your climb back up to 38K (lost about 4K during the recovery). Also, remember to not "cobb" the power up (i.e., don't slam it to CLIMB), at the beginning of the recovery, as this will be too much thrust, pitch the nose up and keep you from breaking the stall effectively.

SPOT 4: Upset Recovery. We were repositioned over Lake Mead, clean, at about 5K. FO went first. While on freeze, given 40 degrees nose high, 287 kts, and told to recover. FO rolled smoothly to 30 degrees of bank and pushed over to the horizon. Rinse and repeat for the CA. Remember, there are peeps in the back, so be as smooth as you can without sacrificing the recovery (watch your A/S during the pushover and don't let it get below VLS).

SPOT 5: Manually Controlled Instrument Arrival and Upset Recovery. CA flew this one. Used the TYSSN 5 ARRIVAL, and started just inside CEJAY at 19K. Hand flown to about TYSSN, then told to recouple the automation. Given DIR PRINO (a fix on the ILS 26L) and while heads down put in an upset recovery. Recovered to wings level, and SPOT over.

SPOT 6: High Altitude, High Energy Go Around. CA's approach to 26L. (This is also a "capture the GS from above" exercise) Just inside LARRE at 6500' and high on GS, cleared for the approach. Was flaps 2, 170 kts SELECTED A/S. Selected V/S to 1800' (target range is 1500-1800), ensured APPR is armed (most important thing), and spun altitude up to 8K (to prevent capturing alt on way down). After GS captured, continued with normal approach and set missed approach altitude. At 5200', told that approach clearance had been cancelled, and given a turnout heading of "Right to 100 degrees at RELIN, climb and maintain 7000". This is where the fun began: CA initially called for 7K and gear up. we had pre-selected the heading, and when we pulled it the plane turned LEFT instead of RIGHT (turns in the shortest direction). Also, we SET 7K on the FCU, but did not SELECT (pull) it! Actually trapped both errors pretty quickly (ok plane continued descent to 4200 but who's counting), turned the AP off and manually turned plane back to the right, FO selected the ALT on the FCU and exercise over (the heading thing was one of the big objectives of this SPOT, and a better answer would be to, instead of pre-setting the heading to 100 degrees, wait until arriving at RELIN to start spinning the heading to the right). Entire Sim took around three hours.

Sim over, re-blued for another ACTUAL year. Good Luck!

March 11, 2021

We had BOS-DCA for RLE 15-1. Started at gate B16 is BOS. Weather was 1/2 mile and 10 degrees. That remained constant so needed engine heat. Assigned runway 15R and the Logan departure. As we were taxiing out, reassigned 22L with weather unchanged and no ships in the harbor. Stopped and reloaded the box. Departed on 22L and vectored to the Logan departure. Climb out uneventful until just prior to level off. Was then told by ATC about moderate turbulence ahead. I sat the FAs down with moderate turbulence procedures. Good thing, it was very rough until we descended back to FL 240. No other issues until started descent and past MXE. Then ECAM Air Bleed Leak 1. Very simple with no procedures. The only issue is to avoid icing. Overcast everywhere. Didn't use my resources ( dispatch, ATC) in deciding how bad the icing was below us. Misread the ATIS for Dulles at 8000 ft ceiling, it was actually 800. So, no better really than DCA, but I decided to go there instead. Should have gone to DCA except for the bafoonery of reading the ATIS wrong. Landing uneventfully. Biggest takeaway, use ALL resources about icing instead of assuming.

Good RAD afterwards. I had unreliable airspeed on departure from LAS.
Next still at LAS was low level windhsear on takeoff for the FO, and I had it on final approach. Then some slow flight at altitude, with turns and stall recoveries. All straight forward. Finished with capturing glide slope from above. Then some unusual attitudes and slow flight/ stall work. All straight forward.

All three sims were very relaxed. Not the hair on fire 800 things to be crammed into a 4 hour sim session like the past.

March 10, 2021

First two days in the sim are exactly as shown for each of the spots. First day is basically training so anything that needs to be repeated can be. Very low stress. Know your triggers and flows same as others have said. They are really wanting to see adherence to SOP's, make sure you know them and training will be a breeze.

The MO session was very easy and low stress and plenty of time to get everything done. RAD involved hot brakes after takeoff and some door issues. Apparently crews are diverting for door ECAM because there isn't really anything to do on the ecam and crews NOT going to the follow ups which have you determine if you have a pressurization issue. If there's a pressurization issue, then divert is good call, otherwise continue to destination. The hot brakes issue is crews are putting the gear down in flight and using the ecam, but when brakes cool, ecam goes away and crews are retracting the gear above the 220 retraction speed. All this is training and instructor will talk you thru it on the ground so no big deal. Then off to KEGE which is really fun and all training as well. We did a couple of approaches to 25 and then did a couple visuals to runway 7. There is a visual approach procedure in the Jepp's for the setup. If you not used to operating at uncontrolled airport, go over the calls in the FOM.

RLE-15-1 BOS-DCA
It was a thru flight. No need to test first flight of the day stuff. Run it like a real flight. They want you to do PA, FA brief, talk to all the normal people. Make sure to use only standard phraseology on push back. No gotcha's during the preflight or taxi out.

ATIS was using 15L. Weather was 10/10 and BR so we turned on eng ice after start. 2 eng taxi. Once around the corner and after we did the before takeoff, they switched runway to 22L and also departure to the Patts5 from the Logan departure. We stopped on the taxiway short of 15L at November and did all the updates to the FMS, speeds, and re-checked the flt plan page for the new departure routing. Re-run the before takeoff checklist to the line. Once complete, we told ground ready to taxi and they gave us instructions for 22L with numerous Rwy crossings and hold shorts. Use lights crossing all rwy's.

Normal takeoff and flew departure and on climb out, moderate turbulence reported between 22-25 our cruise altitude was 30. Call flight attendants and let them know to remain seated and use the term moderate turb procedures in effect. You will call them back when it's safe to get up. Also, make a PA to the pax to let them know you have instructed the flight attendants to remain seated. ATC then told us 260 would be final to DCA. Don't forget to load 260 in the prog page for new cruise altitude. Halfway to DCA we got "Air Eng 1 Bleed Leak". Don't forget "My Aircraft" and then PM runs the quick action or ecam exception......Assign pilot flying and then run the ecam and follow ups. Not much to do here, but wing anti ice inop. Use available resources, PF should call ATC and find out about icing into DCA, PM (CA) should call dispatch and advise and ask for any icing pireps or any knowledge from the dispatcher about possible icing on decent and approach to DCA. We didn't have any reports of icing so we elected to continue to DCA and did the ILS 01, cleared runway and that was the end. They are really emphasizing to use all available resources.

2nd half of the period was upset recovery, wind shear, stalls, and hand flown arrival and departure. Same stuff we did last year in Vegas. We got done with plenty of time to spare. Show up prepared knowing limitations, and triggers and flows, and follow SOP and it will be a breeze.

March 10, 2021 (Short Course)

FO and I had been off for 11 months so we were brought back for a short course, which is actually just the new recurrent with one additional day (day 2). On day 2 there were two of us in room 3S-382 with an instructor and we went through some more systems refresh. Then we headed to room 3S-384 to a functioning Airbus mockup and practiced our flows and checklists, then simulated a short flight (for each pilot) with all of the checklists and flows. It was much needed.

Day 3 is RTS with a sim pilot. Everything occurs at JFK and we had more than enough time (actually only took 3 hours) to feel confident for the next day.

Day 4 is now called MO (maneuvers observation). Once again there was plenty of time and it was a very relaxed no rushed attitude. Most of the approaches happen at MCO then DFW and finally Eagle.

The last day was the RLE followed by the RAD. Our was DCA-BOS. Paperwork says APU electrics are INOP but they cancelled that, so good airplane. Ensure you are not doing the checklist when crossing rwy 04 (after the hold short). During climb out moderate turbulence reported up ahead. Get the FA seated and tell them moderate turbulence procedures in effect. We descended to FL190 for a smooth ride. Then (over PHL) we got ELEC IDG 1 OVHT. When starting the APU we got an auto APU shutdown which forced us into a LAND ASAP. Elected to go to JFK. Anti ice needed once we entered the clouds. We had them vector us through final (ILS13L) to help lose altitude. Then back on final for a normal landing. We forgot to set missed approach altitude so it was still at 1500'. It was fairly quick. Off to on took 36 minutes.

RAD was standard. Kind of fun. (Kind of) After debrief we had only used 3 hours. Great training, as I said, this is exactly like recurrent with the extra day 2.

March 7, 2021

Day 1
Ground school was as usual, not too busy.

Day 2 RTS
Lots of spots as published, plenty of time left to play a little.

Day 3 MO
First half, spots as published, Not rushed.
Second half spots as published went well then we went to KEGE ... this one was busy, Cessna on the runway did not get off in time. Go around. Don’t fly published missed. Climb to 8,500 and enter pattern, left traffic, enter base turn point EG25D (I think this was the name) in fix page. Be configured before this point and set up a 700 V/S decent as you come back to final. They want to hear you talk to CTAF and other traffic as you approach this airport.

Day 4 LOE/RVA
Started BOS to DCA
Level FL260, ECAM IDG Overheat
Do ECAM; APU will not start
Declare emergency. We diverted to PHL, Normal landing, Done

Then more spots:
Approach to stall recovery
Wake upset
Visual to LAS with wind shear
Go around
Wind shear on takeoff after V1
Airspeed just stopped between V1 and rotate
Lifted off with 2,000 feet remaining runway
Everything was straight forward, low stress, no surprises.
Done well ahead of schedule.

 

Note: Many SPOTs in the current CQ are identical or very similar to the SPOTs used in previous R9/R18 sessions.
Click Here to review the previous Intel Reports which are a valuable resource to study past sim experiences.